• Homemade Jam
    Homemade Jam

    Homemade Jam

    Color Story

    A syrup of mixed ripe berries. Homemade Jam is a cool red tempered with blues, purple, black and brown. This shade is kin to our purples as well as our reds. It also plays well with our brown and grey neutrals, all our blues, and the cool greens of Birdbook and Button Jar, making it an excellent choice for inclusion in complex colorwork motifs.

    Homemade Jam is handsome all by itself, too, as seen in Hiroko Fukatsu’s Frida shawl from Wool People 5.

  • Long Johns
    Long Johns

    Long Johns

    Color Story

    Woodsmen’s flannel shirts. Long Johns is a shadowy crimson tinged with brown as well as black. Use it for dramatic garments, irresistible accessories, or elevated basics that will always lift your mood. Long Johns is one of those reds that looks good on people of every complexion and pairs beautifully with colors across the spectrum.

    Jared Flood’s Hawser pullover from BT Fall 14 is knit in Long Johns.

  • Camper
    Camper

    Camper

    Color Story

    Red dawn streaked with wisps of cloud. Camper is a soft red, heavily frosted with white and revealing hints of rust, purple, and grey. This shifting hue may read as pink, salmon, or raspberry depending on the light and the colors nearby. It forms a natural gradient with Homemade Jam and Plume, but also works well with our neutrals.

    We love to pair it with Long Johns and Woodsmoke, as in Jared Flood’s cardigan version of Atlas from BT Kids 1.

  • Wool Socks
    Wool Socks

    Wool Socks

    Color Story

    Peak autumn foliage. Wool Socks is a red brown warmed by rust, camel, orange, and yellow, the roasted version of Embers. Use it in a fall-inspired gradient with Hayloft, Embers and Long Johns, or make a smooth transition to our greens via Embers and Fauna. Wool Socks is also friendly with Plume, if you’re looking for a richly saturated color pairing. This hue is lovely against caramel and olive complexions.

    Amy Christoffers’s Persimmon cardigan from Wool People 6 is knit in Wool Socks.

  • Embers
    Embers

    Embers

    Color Story

    Fox fur gilded by late sunlight. Embers has a ground of rust burnished with red, brown, orange, and yellow. Reach for this hue if you want to knit the essence of autumn into a sweater. In colorwork it naturally forms a gradient with its redder cousin, Wool Socks, and Long Johns. Use Fauna to relate Embers to our greens, particularly Birdbook. Embers also contrasts beautifully with Almanac or Plume for a more playful effect.

    The women’s sample of Gudrun Johnston’s Little Wave cardigan from Wool People 6 is knit in Embers.

  • Hayloft
    Hayloft

    Hayloft

    Color Story

    Harvest time amber gold. Hayloft is yellow caramelized with brown and garnished with orange and olive. It melds beautifully with all our autumn tones, but also makes a sophisticated contrast against our greys and deep blues. Use Hayloft to richly brighten any wardrobe, either in a statement piece like a dramatic blanket-front coat or as an accessory that can lift more somber ensembles.

    Hayloft stars in Jared Flood’s Channel cardigan from BT Winter 13.

  • Sap
    Sap

    Sap

    Color Story

    Green-gold tree frogs in full spring chorus. Sap is built on a base of yellow shot with olive, bright green, orange, and brown. This most electric of our greens is right at home in an autumn palette, too, contrasting beautifully with red-orange and warm brown tones. Or use it for a clean, resonant note against deep blues, purples, and reds—Sap harmonizes with all our most saturated hues. Its versatility as an accent color makes it a great choice for accessories.

    Dawn Catanzaro’s Kennebec cowl from Wool People 5 features Sap.

  • Fauna
    Fauna

    Fauna

    Color Story

    Maple leaves at the first turning. One of our most complex colors, Fauna is a stew of rust and olive lit with yellow, green, and red but simultaneously shaded with brown and black. Fauna’s shifting bronze tones make it the perfect way to move from greens to yellows, oranges, or browns in colorwork. It particularly suits olive and dark complexions and looks beautiful against auburn hair.

    Bristol Ivy’s Thorn wrap from Wool People 4 is knit in Fauna.

  • Tent
    Tent

    Tent

    Color Story

    Pickle green, just the shade of dilly beans and cucumbers brined for summer canning. This lively green is a blend of olive, lime, brown, and yellow with subtle undertones of navy and rust. Tent is the versatile middle value of a yellow-green family with Foothills and Artifact. Try it with Birdbook for a low-contrast, clear green scheme, or use Fauna to bridge between Tent and the orange-reds.

    Tent stands beautifully on its own, too: a fine example is Gudrun Johnston’s large Halligarth shawl from Wool People 7.

  • Foothills
    Foothills

    Foothills

    Color Story

    Prairie haze. Fields after the harvest. Foothills is a mild sage green comprising white, grey, and yellow shaded with black, the palest member of a family that includes Tent and Artifact. Garments knit in this color make a good addition to wardrobes containing pale neutrals or olive greens for those with strong coloring. Consider Foothills for a surprising and effective accent color against cool reds and warm purples.

    Foothills stars in Bristol Ivy’s Devlan pullover from the Wool People 7 collection.

  • Birdbook
    Birdbook

    Birdbook

    Color Story

    The world beneath the Amazon canopy. A smoky, complex middle green, Birdbook is jungly mix of olive, black, and green shot with parrot streaks of yellow, red, and navy. Containing both warm and cool elements, it suits most skin tones. Birdbook shades naturally to Meteorite and, in the lighter direction, to Tent and Fauna. Across the colorwheel, it perfectly complements Long Johns and Homemade Jam.

    Leila Raabe’s Bough hat from Wool People 6 is worked with Birdbook.

  • Artifact
    Artifact

    Artifact

    Color Story

    Late summer in a conifer forest. Our darkest and earthiest green is a blend of black, yellow, olive, and brown, touched with white and navy. This handsome and sophisticated shade is wonderful for menswear and could also serve as an unusual but effective dark neutral ground for colorwork accents in a feminine jumper. Artifact is Tent’s shadowy cousin; it also pairs naturally with Foothills for high contrast colorwork.

    Jared Flood’s Fort pullover from BT Men 1 features Artifact.

  • Button Jar
    Button Jar

    Button Jar

    Color Story

    Mallard’s plumage. Button Jar is a playful but sophisticated teal of bright blue and green muddled with brown and black and then deepened with olive and yellow. It looks good on everyone and pairs exuberantly with all our boldest, brightest hues. Try Button Jar for a modern cabled pullover to layer over collared shirts, dresses, or jeans—the depth of its color recipe makes it surprisingly easy to pair with a full spectrum of other saturated colors. It also makes a welcome impact in more neutral wardrobes.

    Véronik Avery’s Vika pullover from our BT Kids collection is knit in Button Jar.

  • Faded Quilt
    Faded Quilt

    Faded Quilt

    Color Story

    Riffles in the lake. Faded Quilt is a smoky blend of blues with white, brown, and grey. This soothing shade exudes down-home comfort, so choose it for a garment you know you’ll wear to rags, for a child’s special blanket, for a handsome throw in the family room. Or make a beautiful hat and scarf set for blue-eyed loved one. Faded Quilt is a natural partner for the full range of our browns and forms a gorgeous gradient with Stormcloud and Truffle Hunt.

    Michele Wang used Faded Quilt for her nautically inspired Bellows cardigan in our BT Fall 14 collection.

  • Almanac
    Almanac

    Almanac

    Color Story

    Bluewater sailing. This seafarer’s blend of three blues is shaded with black and enlivened with a few frisking whitecaps. This stout and cheerful hue is great for menswear, children’s wear, and women’s garments—in short, it suits everyone. Almanac is a friendly color that readily harmonizes or pleasingly contrasts with BT hues across the spectrum.

    Almanac is featured in Carol Feller’s Hathaway pullover from Wool People 4.

  • Old World
    Old World

    Old World

    Color Story

    An Impressionist’s starless night. Old World is a meld of black and navy grounded with a touch of grey and brown and shot through with bright blue and a frisson of red. Garments knit from Old World will appear navy from a distance, but are much livelier up close. This hue allies naturally with our reds and purples as well as our blues, and also makes a sparkling contrast across the spectrum to Hayloft.

    Leila Raabe’s Spire shawl from the Loft Collection is knit with Old World.

  • Plume
    Plume

    Plume

    Color Story

    Inky, regal purple. This symphony of black, purple, and navy with undertones of red is an elegant hue, perfect for those who love rich color but seek sophistication as well. Handsome on men as well as women, Plume is a good choice for taking a classic garment somewhere unexpected or for lending flair to clean, modern shapes. In colorwork, we love it with Wool Socks and Homemade Jam, as in Jared Flood’s feminine Grettir pullover from BT Winter 13.

    Michele Wang’s Trillium cardigan from BT Fall 13 is knit in Plume.

  • Thistle
    Thistle

    Thistle

    Color Story

    Red-purple lilac blossoms. This sprightly purple is muddled with navy, brown, red, and white for warm and cool notes. Thistle is obviously kin to Plume, Old World, and Blanket Fort; it’s also happy to pair with Long Johns and Camper or any of our brightest, clearest hues. Playful Thistle is perhaps rather intense for adult-size garments, but is perfect for accessories or in colorwork with a more subdued background tone.

    Jared Flood used Thistle for the pompom version of his Skiff hat in BT Fall 14.

  • Blanket Fort
    Blanket Fort

    Blanket Fort

    Color Story

    Twilight on the porch swing. Blanket Fort is a nostalgic cool lavender with hints of navy, purple, and red. This sweetly feminine shade is ideal for delicate garments with a touch of lace and especially suits fair complexions. Wear it when you’re catching fireflies in Mason jars or picnicking in the shade of a gracious old tree. Blanket Fort pairs well with our blues, purples, and cool reds; it’s also fetching with our cool greens.

    Ann McCauley’s Corinna pullover from Wool People 3 is knit with Blanket Fort.

  • Postcard
    Postcard

    Postcard

    Color Story

    The pearly first light of winter dawn. Postcard is a gentle newsprint grey lit with flickers of red. Try it in a gradient with Blanket Fort and Homemade Jam or let it stand alone to create faintly rosy garments that pair wonderfully with dark greens and with cool, pale greys and cream tones.

    Yoko Hatta’s Natsumi from Wool People 7 features Postcard.

  • Fossil
    Fossil

    Fossil

    Color Story

    Stags’ velvety antlers. Fossil is white warmed with a whisper of brown. Our palest neutral, Fossil begins our brown gradient, shading gradually into Woodsmoke, Barn Owl, Nest, and Pumpernickel. Its faint caramel glow makes it a good choice for complexions that tend to look washed out by pale colors. Fossil is unparalleled for rendering ornate cable motifs or stitch patterns and creates timeless garments you can pair with anything in your closet.

    Julie Hoover’s Berenice lace and cable top from BT Kids 1 is knit with Fossil.

  • Woodsmoke
    Woodsmoke

    Woodsmoke

    Color Story

    Weathered driftwood. A gentle blend of white and brown, darker than Fossil and paler than Barn Owl, Woodsmoke is perfect for garments that will coordinate effortlessly with any wardrobe. It partners easily with colors across the BT palette and is perhaps particularly handsome with our oranges, as seen in the alternate version of Julie Hoover’s Benton pullover from BT Winter 13.

    Woodsmoke is featured in Heidi Kirrmaier’s Boardwalk layering top from Wool People 3.

  • Barn Owl
    Barn Owl

    Barn Owl

    Color Story

    Milky cocoa. Barn Owl is a warm mid-brown that completes the gradient between Woodsmoke and Nest. To compare the values of Barn Owl and Nest, look at Grace Anna Farrow’s Trestle pullover from Wool People 6, which combines the two shades in stripes. Barn Owl pairs well with our deep greens, blues, and purples and makes a good backdrop for colorwork.

    Ann McCauley used Barn Owl for her Amherst sweater dress in Wool People 5.

  • Nest
    Nest

    Nest

    Color Story

    Rich mink brown flecked with white. This hearty hue is flattering to most skin tones and is a good choice for accessories that will frame the face and coordinate easily with outerwear. Nest’s ability to pull disparate bright colors together and ground them also makes it wonderful for layering garments. Try it for the body of sweaters with vibrant colorwork yokes or hems.

    Thea Colman’s Allegheny dress from Wool People 1 features Nest.

  • Meteorite
    Meteorite

    Meteorite

    Color Story

    An unearthly metallic brown shaded with black and laced with primary blue, yellow, and red. This unusual color can work with greens—try it in a gradient with Birdbook and Tent—or with the red-oranges, Embers and Wool Socks. Garments knit from Meteorite will read from a distance as dark olive brown and pair well with creamy or camel neutrals and with dark jeans.

    Meteorite is featured in Robin Melanson’s Themis cardigan from Wool People 3.

  • Pumpernickel
    Pumpernickel

    Pumpernickel

    Color Story

    Good earth. This mix of black and brown is richly dark and warm, like a strong cup of coffee. Pumpernickel is splendid on its own; it also forms a beautiful base for colorwork with our other browns and greys or grounds our bright hues. This mahogany brown looks good on everyone and with everything, so it’s a natural choice to bring into your wardrobe for staples you’ll reach for again and again.

    Thea Colman’s Macallan vest from Wool People 4 is knit in Pumpernickel.

  • Truffle Hunt
    Truffle Hunt

    Truffle Hunt

    Color Story

    Sleek seals’ fur reflecting the waves. Truffle Hunt is a milky brown shaded with black and navy. It forms a beautiful blue-brown gradient with Stormcloud and Faded Quilt as well as adding a note of interest to the brown gradient between Nest and Pumpernickel. Truffle Hunt is favorite choice for dark neutral garments with unusual depth; if you live in blue jeans, this shade is an especially good choice for a sweater.

    Véronik Avery’s Landfall blanket coat in the BT Winter 14 collection is knit in Truffle Hunt. (Note that we styled it with a scarf in Stormcloud to compare the two shades.)

  • Stormcloud
    Stormcloud

    Stormcloud

    Color Story

    The river at flood stage. Stormcloud is a dusky blue-brown blend of grey, brown, white, and a peppering of navy. Closely related to the darker Truffle Hunt, it also makes the perfect transition between our pale browns and our blue range—use it to shift seamlessly from Barn Owl to Faded Quilt. Stormcloud makes wonderful workaday garments to wear with jeans. Or try it as an elegant cool neutral to set off bright colors, as in Jared Flood’s Kelpie shawl from BT Winter 13.

    
Véronik Avery used Stormcloud for her Hugo pullover in BT Men 1.

  • Cast Iron
    Cast Iron

    Cast Iron

    Color Story

    Moonlight on the water. Cast Iron is black grizzled with luminous white. This charcoal grey is the darkest member of a gradient with Soot, Sweatshirt, and Snowbound. Use it for menswear, for dressy cardigans, or anywhere you want a lively black that generously reflects light rather than swallowing it. It’s easier on the eyes than pure black during the knitting process, too.

    Michele Wang’s Slade cardigan from BT Men 1 is knit in Cast Iron.

  • Soot
    Soot

    Soot

    Color Story

    Salt and pepper in equal measure. Soot is a strong cinder grey that bridges the gradient between Sweatshirt and Cast Iron. It has a similar value to our most saturated bright hues; try pairing it with Hayloft for striking colorwork. Soot renders understated staple garments or showier pieces with timeless elegance.

    Soot is featured in Véronik Avery’s Fuse cardigan from Wool People 2.

  • Sweatshirt
    Sweatshirt

    Sweatshirt

    Color Story

    Flakes of ash from last night’s campfire. Sweatshirt is a calm middle grey, splitting the difference between Soot and Snowbound. Equally right for classic sports sweaters or showy modern shapes, Sweatshirt is a truly versatile shade. Light enough to make the most of intricate cables or stitch patterns but dark enough not to wash out paler skin tones, this is a color to reach for again and again.

    Jared Flood’s Timberline pullover from BT Men 1 is knit in Sweatshirt.

  • Snowbound
    Snowbound

    Snowbound

    Color Story

    Gathering clouds. This palest of our greys is a soothing cool neutral that will render garments at home in any wardrobe. It’s a natural choice to show off elaborate cables or textural designs; it also works so well with the rest of the BT palette that it makes a perfect backdrop for bold colorwork, as in Leila Raabe’s Stasis pullover from our Spring Thaw collection or Julie Hoover’s Magnus hoodie from BT Kids.

    Michele Wang’s Stonecutter pullover from BT Fall 12 is a beautiful example of Snowbound standing alone.

SKU: SHELTER.

Shelter

100% Targhee-Columbia Wool

$12.50 / skein

Order a Shade Card to experience accurate colors and textures

The distinctive character of Targhee-Columbia wool shines in our versatile medium-weight yarn. Shelter is woolen spun, meaning the fibers remain in a lofty jumble that traps air and offers remarkable warmth and lightness. Its two plies are gently twisted to preserve that buoyant quality, so Shelter is a little more delicate than most commercial yarns. Woolen-spun yarns are also more adaptable in gauge, as they can compress to a dense sport weight or bloom to cohere as a gauzy fabric when worked on large needles. Shelter has a dry, soft hand and a faintly rustic nature; woolen spinning sometimes results in slightly thinner or thicker sections, and you’ll find the occasional fleck of vegetable matter that proves our wool is never treated with harsh chemicals. Garments knit from Shelter achieve their full beauty after a wet blocking, as each stitch relaxes and bonds with its neighbors to produce an even, light, plush fabric with a halo. You shouldn’t notice any change in gauge. Shelter is designed to be a workhorse yarn that invites cables, ribbing, textured stitch motifs, open work, plain stockinette and garter stitch. We think it’s ideal for sweaters of every variety, winter accessories, and blankets.

Click here to view patterns designed especially for Shelter.

Please note that the color settings on your monitor may not display yarn colors accurately. Shade cards are available for purchase with free shipping.

Yarn Specs:

  • 50 grams | 140 yards | worsted weight
  • 100% Wyoming-grown Targhee-Columbia wool
  • Dyed in Philadelphia. Spun in New Hampshire.

As a result of its woolen-spun manufacturing process, Shelter is suitable for a wonderful range of gauges:

  • 5 stitches to 1"  |  Suggested Needle: 4½ mm (US 7)
  • 4½ stitches to 1"  |  Suggested Needle: 5 mm (US 8)
  • 4¼ stitches to 1"  |  Suggested Needle: 5½ mm (US 9)