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Patch, our third Outpost pattern, pays homage to many a knitter’s first project — the humble garter stitch scarf. Lisa Carney-Fenton elevates this tried-and-true formula with four striping options and a clever method for a polished edge: her Elegant I-Cord Edge technique, which involves concealing the non-working yarn inside the edging, keeping it tidy and eliminating the need to weave in multiple yarn tails during finishing. These thoughtfully-considered details make Patch a delightfully versatile pattern to knit and an effortlessly cool scarf to wear.

Handknitting kits — ready to cast on or gift — for the Broad Stripe version of Patch in Arbor are available now in our webstore through the end of December. We thought up eight playful color combinations to give you an idea of the myriad possibilities our Arbor palette provides!

If you’d like to try your hand at assembling your own unique color combinations for the multiple versions of Patch, why not try experimenting with the schematic provided in the pattern? We’ve found it to be quite a useful visual tool when planning our alternate color combinations. Plus, there are few things more fun than a knitterly coloring page (download here)!

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This holiday season, we’ve thoughtfully curated a selection of hand knitting patterns as well as kits, books, and stationery to warm the hearts of you and yours. Whether you have knitters in your life or are a knitter yourself, give the gift of inspiration and a woolly embrace!

Handknitting Kits

Our knitting kits are hand-assembled with care and ship ready to gift in a handsome, black Kraft paper box sealed with our Brooklyn Tweed label. Tucked inside, you’ll find enough pre-wound skeins of yarn for the kit project in the colorway of your choice nestled among recyclable decorative fill. The kits also include a coupon code for the kit pattern and a yarn care card, all slipped into a black envelope you can reuse for holiday correspondence. Additionally, at your request, we will happily include a handwritten note for your loved one for a personalized touch.

This holiday season, we’re offering seasonal handknitting kits for the Breckenridge Scarf, Fretwork Cowl, Skiff Watchcap, Skiff Beanie, and Voe Hat.

As a special gift, we’re also including a Notebook for Knitters in each kit through the holiday season. Available in three different designs, our notebooks are printed locally and are the perfect size for on-the-go writing, sketching, and recording progress on current projects — or planning future ones. Organize your thoughts using the index page, and flip to the back of the book for quick Needle Size conversions or measuring progress with the printed ruler!

Books

A happy addition to any knitter’s library are our pattern books: Woolens by Jared Flood, CAPSULE: Michele Wang, and CAPSULE: Olga Buraya-Kefelian. These are available in print form or e-book form and are the perfect gifts of inspiration for your knitter (or yourself!) as they plan projects for the coming year.

Sweater Cards

Send the warmest wishes to your dear ones with our Sweater Cards, a pack of 15 blank greeting cards featuring watercolor paintings of some of our most beloved designs from the Design Team’s archive. (Funnily enough, we’ve found that they can also serve as handy IOUs for a sweater gift-knit!)

Digital Gift Card

If you’re stuck on what to give the knitters in your life, gift the gift of choice with our digital gift cards! Completely stress-free, they’re a great way to ensure that your knitter finds the yarn and/or pattern they love.

Holiday Wishlist

Our Holiday Wishlist is a great way to take the guesswork out of holiday gift planning. Simply ask your knitter to download it here and fill in with their hand knitting kit, book, yarn, and/or pattern of choice — or fill it in yourself with your woolly wishes. (Don’t forget to check it twice!)

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There’s always extra room in our knitting bags for a hat that offers a relaxing knitting experience coupled with great style. With this in mind, we asked Brooklyn-based architect and knitwear designer Emily Greene to design our first Outpost pattern, and her wonderful unisex Hatch Hat really checks both boxes for us.

Requiring only the most basic of stitches (knit, purl, and simple decreases), Hatch is a fun and friendly pattern. Aside from a few transition rounds which might require your attention, the project’s ease and simplicity will allow you to knit while carrying on a conversation with friends or simply let your mind get into the meditative rhythm of the ribbing. Since the crown shaping can be worked from either the chart or written directions, we think everyone will be happy with this easy people-pleaser of a pattern.

Knit in texture-enhancing Arbor as either a beanie or classic watchcap, Hatch’s columned fabric opens up beautifully as it stretches slightly about the head. Its orderly progression through a scale of ribbings may make it the perfect topper for mathematical or engineering minds to knit (or receive)!

Intrigued? To tempt you further, for the month of October we’re offering Hatch with a little extra fanfare: as a kit in your choice of 30 timeless colors.

Should you, too decide to devote a little corner of your knitting bag to Hatch, we’d love to see your progress — you can share with the hashtag #HatchHat. We can’t wait to see your Hatches!

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The cooler months here in Portland, Oregon often find our hardy locals eschewing umbrellas to brave the rain in hoodies, and our obvious choice against the local elements is a knit hat tucked into a pocket or bag. Wanting this workhorse to serve faithfully through capricious downpours as well as fashion trends, we look for versatile hat patterns we trust. Our go-to lately has been Mawson, a watch cap released last summer to commemorate the launch of Shelter’s three marled hues.

During the crush of last year’s gift knitting season in our office — we lovingly called it our “Mawson holiday” — the BT crew knit a total of 12 Mawson hats. It wasn’t long before we reached for Arbor to try a modification of the original, and we wanted to share it with you, too.

Arbor’s Mawson uses the exact directions as the original Shelter version (the stretchy ribbed fabric makes for a standard fit for both DK and worsted weight yarns), and we even riffed a bit on the original, adding a half-twisted rib* version to highlight the worsted-spun stitch definition. As a slightly more fitted hat, the Arbor version makes a great foil against the wind. And a palette of 30 shades offers a chance for a sophisticated nod to a favorite piece of outerwear or even a beloved alma mater.

Even if you’re not as adventurous as the pattern’s namesake Australian explorer, Mawson’s rib cable cast on and unique double decreases may still bring you a few new discoveries in your knitting. Special crown decreases lay flat and make the hat completely reversible, while also forming a distinct three-legged crown shaping. (Andriknitsalot of Ravelry keenly observed the resemblance to a trillium flower.)

The humble back-and-forth of Mawson’s one knit, one purl stitch combo — any way you twist it — is both relaxing and handsome. Along with providing a meditative knitting process, it gives the fabric enough stretchiness and structure to allow slouch without flop.

We’re not sure yet which patterns will go viral across our BT knitting bags this fall, but this is one we have our eyes on as our thoughts turn happily to cooler weather!

* Our half-twisted rib variation simply involves working all the knit stitches TBL (through the back loop) on all even-numbered rounds. In other words, twist your knit stitches every other round to achieve this distinctive variation.

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Triangular shawls offer a welcome outerwear substitute on chilly days when it’s cold but heavier garments aren’t quite necessary. These adaptable layers are easily incorporated into a wardrobe and can be worn time and time again. Patterned triangular shawls also offer a little more warmth and heft than their lacier cousins. We start grabbing for them right around this time of year as the transition from summer to autumn begins.

This season we’re revisiting Kindling, published in Wool People 4 and a favorite from our textured triangle archive. Originally designed for Loft held doubled (shown right), the pattern’s architectural lines and textures make a great canvas for DK-weight Arbor, too. Knit in our glacial “Rainier” colorway, the arrow motifs and unique four-stitch borders have a clean, sculptural quality with each line etched into the fabric.

Today we’ve released an update for the original Kindling pattern to include yardage and gauge requirements for the Arbor version as well. (If you already own a copy of the pattern, be sure to check for the update in your pattern library!)

We’ve also rounded up a few more of our favorite texture-rich triangular shawls — also worked in Arbor — for additional early-autumn project inspiration.

Shown L to R: Terra, Brora, Burnaby Shawl

As satisfying to knit as they are to wear, we look forward each year to casting on a new shawl as a companion project through the brisk seasons ahead.

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We are so very proud to welcome Gudrun Johnston to our design team! Gudrun has been an inspiring presence in the independent knitwear design community for many years and we are thrilled to be collaborating with her.

Gudrun was born in Shetland, where her mother ran a successful knitwear design company called The Shetland Trader. Gudrun revived the name to publish two collections kindled by love of her homeland. She now lives in the United States with her family, but returns frequently to Shetland to visit and lead knitting tours.

Gudrun’s heritage is prominent in her design work, whether she is creating lace-edged haps or Fair Isle-inspired colorwork. Her contemporary aesthetic and love of experimenting with new techniques make her designs both modern and timeless. She loves seamless construction and yoke patterning, whether in textured stitches or colorwork, and her designs are always eminently wearable and enduring.

We celebrate Gudrun’s arrival at BT with a special pattern release to launch our Summer of Lace knitalong. Brora is a distinctive shawl, printed all over with triangles of garter stitch and rimmed in an arrowhead lace motif that combines garter  and eyelets to achieve a flintknapped texture. The pattern includes directions for two weights: a breezy complement to summer dresses in Vale or a slightly larger triangle with comforting weight and warmth in Arbor. Brora uses a traditional Shetland construction, beginning at the base point of the main fabric with a single stitch and growing by means of yarnovers at each edge. These linked loops simplify the task of picking up stitches to begin the lace edging. The pattern teaches the Icelandic Bind Off technique to yield an elastic edge that partners effectively with garter stitch.

 

Brora is available as a limited-edition kit in our webstore. Choose any color of Vale or Arbor and we’ll wind the yarn for you so you can cast on right away or be ready to gift the kit to your favorite knitter (we can even ship the kit directly to him or her). Your handsomely packaged kit will include a coupon code for digital download of the Brora pattern.

For domestic orders, place your kit order by Friday, June 30 in order to receive your yarn and pattern in time to cast on for our Summer of Lace KAL beginning July 7. Read more about the KAL here.

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The designers we selected to contribute to Wool People 11 were among the first knitters to sample our new Rambouillet laceweight, Vale. Today we share their impressions of the yarn as we feature their beautiful stoles.

Natalie Servant contributed Prism to this collection. Printed with diamonds and rhombuses, this geometric design can be a lace stole or a cowl. The charted shapes are filled with shifting textures — knit, purl, garter — so there’s more solid fabric than in many lace accessories, which puts Vale’s smooth and balanced preparation on display.

Natalie wrote, “I really enjoyed knitting with Vale. I found it easy to produce even stockinette and reverse stockinette. The surprise for me was when I washed and blocked the swatch: the drape was fantastic. The hardest part about working with Vale was having to send back the unused skeins!”

Sandhya Shadangi’s Ravine is patterned with rivulets of branching, shifting, straightening eyelets. A good stretch on blocking wires evens the long sides and opens the organic motifs to stand out against the stockinette background. Despite Vale’s elasticity, it’s a biddable yarn that accepts blocking to become fluid and drapey.

Sandhya’s impression of Vale was that it’s crisp, soft, and springy. Her fabric blocked beautifully to yield clean and even stitches with good definition, and it retained the crisp softness that had first struck her when handling it in the skein. “Overall, I think it’s perfect for lace. And I can imagine it being great for super-light garments that would also hold their shape nicely,” she concluded.

Amy van de Laar had this to say after creating Leadlight, a stole with a pattern of geometric tracery radiating from a pinhole cast-on:

“Vale is springy, light and soft, but substantial and full of personality. It’s next-to-the-skin soft, and it blocks easily and drapes beautifully — just perfect for lace knitting. The colour Heron is a calm, neutral, mid-toned grey with a subtle sheen to it.”

Fans of Plains, a limited edition yarn that we produced in collaboration with Mountain Meadow Mill in Wyoming, have been asking how Vale compares. Our customer service specialist, Jamie Maccarthy, describes the distinction between them this way:

“In spite of their commonalities (Vale and Plains are both two-ply, worsted spun, breed-specific laceweight yarns made from Rambouillet fleece grown on the plains of Wyoming), they do differ. Plains is a slightly rustic yarn, spun a bit thick-and-thin with a lot of spring in its step. While Vale maintains some of the bounce that Plains has, it is a polished yarn with an even weight and twist, which would be lovely knit up into a light top or sweater.” Read more about the development and characteristics of both Vale and Plains here.

What are you making with Vale? We’d love to know your impressions of it! Don’t forget to tag your project photos with #ValeYarn so we can follow your progress. We’ll be reposting some of our favorites on our Instagram account in the coming weeks.

@jess_schreibstein, @looplondonloves, @softsweater, @knitgraffiti, @minib, @jen_beeman

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Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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The season of twinkly lights, eggnog, and snowball fights is the most wonderful time of the year — for woolens!  Some of us are trying to calculate how many hours of sleep we can exchange for crafting time to eke out a few more handmade gifts; others are blissfully escaping the chaos by casting on a long-term project that has nothing to do with the holidays and stresses of the wider world. If you’re in either of these camps, or simply dreaming of your next adventure in knitting, we have a surprise for you today: BT Winter 17, dropping early this year!

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Our house designers have decked the halls with twelve new garments and four accessories that use all four of Brooklyn Tweed’s core yarn lines. This collection includes our very first garment designs for Arbor, our worsted-spun DK Targhee wool. We’re so excited to show you what this new yarn can do on a larger canvas! Jared Flood’s masculine Svenson pullover, Norah Gaughan’s Shoji cocoon cardigan, and Véronik Avery’s Nila lap-front pullover were designed to make the most of Arbor’s vivid stitch definition and drape.

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If you need gift-knitting inspiration, Winter 17 offers up several unisex accessories. The Lancet hat can be worked in chunky Quarry for soft, tweedy, practically instant results or in Arbor for crisply defined chevrons and a full, nuanced palette. The Proof hat and Proof scarf can be paired for perfectly matched winter warmth.

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If your world needs a meditative still point, the soothing stockinette of Julie Hoover’s Rivage coat or the hypnotic shifting textures of Michele Wang’s Binary scarf may do the trick.

This collection is all about cozy comfort trimmed with distinctive details and innovative textures. We hope you’ll find something in the new lookbook to brighten the season for yourself and your loved ones. Happy knitting!

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We’re thrilled to unveil an all-new 100% American yarn today! It’s long been our goal to expand the range of Brooklyn Tweed offerings, but a great deal of planning, care, and time are required to build lasting partnerships, source everything domestically, and make sure our supply chain is robust enough to meet customer demand. Arbor has been in the works for more than a year — it’s entirely different from our woolen-spun core lines and its journey from sheep to skein is wholly new.

The fiber

Arbor comes from purebred Targhee sheep grazing the rangelands of Montana and South Dakota. The Targhee is an American breed, based on Rambouillet stock but augmented with Corriedale and Lincoln longwool for strength. Targhee yarn knits up as supple, long-wearing fabric that’s luxuriously soft but everyday durable.

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The Milling Process

We send our Targhee clip to the historic Jagger Brothers Spinning Mill in southern Maine for worsted processing. This yarn is not the rustic jumble of lightly twisted fibers you’ve come to expect from Brooklyn Tweed. Worsted spinning involves combing all the fibers into smooth alignment before spinning to produce a perfectly even roving. Arbor is a bouncy, round 3-ply yarn with a tight twist for superior stitch definition and strength.

The Palette

We wanted Arbor to be a celebration of color with a deep, nuanced range of hues. From the velvety depths of Nightfall and Dorado to the blaze of Firebrush and the tang of Tincture, our custom-dyed solids span the spectrum. The neutrals offer unexpected twists — the faded black denim of Porter, the subtle warm tones of Humpback, the lichen green of Gale, the barely-there blush of pink in Degas. A few of our favorites from the Plains palette — Morandi, Rainier, and Treehouse — now have a permanent home in the Arbor line. These colors are created with minimal impact on the environment by the master dyers at Saco River Dyehouse, the country’s only organically certified yarn dyeing operation.

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The Collection

To introduce this new yarn, Jared Flood has created a tasting menu of accessories that will let you sample Arbor in bite-size projects or wrap yourself in rich color at a larger scale. Some of the patterns are familiar favorites from the Brooklyn Tweed archives reworked for Arbor’s gauge and unique characteristics; others are fresh offerings. The Arbor Collection includes nine patterns for hats, scarves, shawls, and cowls that sing the yarn’s praises in cables, twisted stitches, and textural motifs. With gift knitting season upon us, we hope you’ll find inspiration in our new lookbook for treating your knitworthy loved ones.

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We’re so excited about our new partnerships in the U.S. textile industry that have allowed us to bring you Arbor, and we hope it will find a home in your workbasket. We can’t wait to hear what you think and to see what you’ll make.

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