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Well worn and worn well.

Our Deep Fall 18 release welcomes the crisp fall air with garments and accessories that merge classic, minimalist style with casual utility.

Crafted by our Design Team with a focus on purposeful fit, proportion, and shaping details, the pieces here invite easy styling. We curated fitted silhouettes (Blume and Svenson for Her) that make for polished, standalone pieces;

relaxed pullovers (Aldous, Solenn, and Berenice) that inspire fun layering;

and an exquisitely textured roomy cardigan and bold accessories (Haskell, High Pines Hat, and Leander) to throw on and tie a complete look together.

These pieces are happy to play with beloved closet staples, or to form a foundation for a capsule wardrobe intended to be well worn and worn well.

Here is understated sophistication to reach for through the seasons — we hope you find a piece that makes your eyes and hands sing!

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We are pleased to announce that the entire 12-piece Winter 18 collection is now available in French, Japanese, German, and Russian.

We began our full-collection translations initiative in a concerted effort to continue supporting diversity within our collective knitting culture. We believe that our knitting community is a worldwide community — connecting with, sharing with, and learning from one another on a global scale is now easier and more instantaneous than ever before. However, language still remains a barrier for many. As such, we hope that with this translations release we can share the revelatory night music and poetry of Winter 18 with more knitters around the world.* We are also committed to offering collection and individual pattern translations in more languages in the future — let us know what languages are on your wishlist!

* Our sincerest thanks goes to Bianca French (German), Marina Melnikova (Russian), Sophie Oudry-Braillon (French), and our Japanese translator (who wishes to remain anonymous) for the dedicated work they have put into helping us realize Winter 18 Translations.

Accessing Translated Patterns

When you purchase a Brooklyn Tweed pattern through our webstore or on Ravelry.com, the pattern PDF will automatically be available in all of its translations. The file name of each PDF designates its language. If you have already purchased a pattern from Winter 18, the translated versions are available to download in your BT account and/or Ravelry library. (If you purchased patterns from our webstore, read how to transfer them to your Ravelry library here.)

Additionally, our Pattern Translations page serves as a resource where you can find a frequently updated list of all the translations available for individual Brooklyn Tweed patterns.

 

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While our Winter 18 lookbook is a celebration of darkness and mystery, a burst of light can change the mood of a garment entirely and also serves to illuminate stitch work. We knit some of the collection pieces twice to highlight the dazzlingly different effect of cool and warm colors.

Geiger in Kettle whispers its beauty, drawing the viewer in close to seek out the details. In Klimt, it trumpets:

We love a bright scarf to banish the winter blahs. Bevel truly sings in exultant yellows and reds:

Freja, the kind of wear-with-everything basic we like to keep in neutral colors, received a contrasting swing from Obsidian to Sandstone:

We’re interested in subtle shifts, too. Here’s Peaks warmed up with Caribou and Fossil for a gentle glow:

Whether you prefer the quiet mystery of the dark side or the traffic-stopping vibrant colors, we thank you for your warm welcome of Winter 18 and look forward to watching your own versions of these garments take shape. Please join the KAL thread in our Ravelry group and tag your social media sharing with #BTWinter18KAL so we can enjoy your photos!

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Every year we find ourselves eagerly awaiting the end of summer and the transition to fall. We’re especially excited to share with you this year’s BT Fall collection because it reminds us of all the things we love about the season. We’re looking forward to settling down to work in earnest on our cold-weather wardrobes and for any excuse to wear our knitwear in the meantime.

Join us on Ravelry for our BT Fall 17 KAL to kickstart this transitional knitting season. Choose your favorite pattern (or two!) from the BT Fall 17 collection and join in the fun — the official cast-on day is September 29 so there’s plenty of time to mull over your ideas. We invite you to share what you’re planning to knit in the BT Fan Club forum as the kick-off approaches.

In celebration of the KAL, the Wallace wrap pattern is available to purchase as a limited-edition kit with Quarry yarn. This quick-to-knit and easy-to-memorize pattern will keep you busy throughout the KAL, and you’ll be sure to cross the KAL finish line with a wrap large enough for keeping warm through the rest of the season’s knitting. The Wallace kit ships for free domestically through September 22, just in time to reach you for cast-on day.

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September in the Pacific Northwest is for picking apples, walking the riverbanks under yellow alders, and gathering with friends to watch flocks of migrating swifts bed down for the night in the old school chimneys. Inspired by Oregon country living, our Fall 17 collection offers respite from the city grind. Whether you prefer to curl up in a handsome library with a view of the forest fringe or walk the pastures amongst horses and llamas, the lookbook we’ll release on Wednesday the 13th promises solace and spark for your autumn knitting plans.

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We are so very proud to welcome Gudrun Johnston to our design team! Gudrun has been an inspiring presence in the independent knitwear design community for many years and we are thrilled to be collaborating with her.

Gudrun was born in Shetland, where her mother ran a successful knitwear design company called The Shetland Trader. Gudrun revived the name to publish two collections kindled by love of her homeland. She now lives in the United States with her family, but returns frequently to Shetland to visit and lead knitting tours.

Gudrun’s heritage is prominent in her design work, whether she is creating lace-edged haps or Fair Isle-inspired colorwork. Her contemporary aesthetic and love of experimenting with new techniques make her designs both modern and timeless. She loves seamless construction and yoke patterning, whether in textured stitches or colorwork, and her designs are always eminently wearable and enduring.

We celebrate Gudrun’s arrival at BT with a special pattern release to launch our Summer of Lace knitalong. Brora is a distinctive shawl, printed all over with triangles of garter stitch and rimmed in an arrowhead lace motif that combines garter  and eyelets to achieve a flintknapped texture. The pattern includes directions for two weights: a breezy complement to summer dresses in Vale or a slightly larger triangle with comforting weight and warmth in Arbor. Brora uses a traditional Shetland construction, beginning at the base point of the main fabric with a single stitch and growing by means of yarnovers at each edge. These linked loops simplify the task of picking up stitches to begin the lace edging. The pattern teaches the Icelandic Bind Off technique to yield an elastic edge that partners effectively with garter stitch.

 

Brora is available as a limited-edition kit in our webstore. Choose any color of Vale or Arbor and we’ll wind the yarn for you so you can cast on right away or be ready to gift the kit to your favorite knitter (we can even ship the kit directly to him or her). Your handsomely packaged kit will include a coupon code for digital download of the Brora pattern.

For domestic orders, place your kit order by Friday, June 30 in order to receive your yarn and pattern in time to cast on for our Summer of Lace KAL beginning July 7. Read more about the KAL here.

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Our latest collection, BT Yokes, offers even the most seasoned colorwork knitter lots of opportunity for experimentation. We had fun playing with color options for Schulz, a unisex pullover designed by Michele Wang. Try Cinnabar or Thistle for a bright pop of vintage nostalgia, or a neutral like Cast Iron or Pumpernickel for a slightly more subdued effect. These are just a few ideas — we can’t wait to see what you come up with!

The colorways as shown in the photo above:

1 — Almanac (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

2 — Tent (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

3 — Thistle (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

4 — Cast Iron (C1 & C3), Fossil (C2)

5 — Pumpernickel (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

6 — Embers (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

7 — Hayloft (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

8 — Cinnabar (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

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Sunbursts, trees and stars, reindeer and snowflakes, mutable landscapes of blended color. In vivid hues or in natural sheep shades, figural or geometric in design, the yoke sweaters of the North Atlantic are distinctive and enduring. The story of their creation in the 20th century is one of enterprise and canny marketing as knitters leveraged traditional skills to make ends meet in a rapidly changing and newly global economy.

The Icelandic lopapeysa, the Scandinavian and Shetland yokes, and the sweaters of the Bohus Stickning cooperative in Sweden may all have their roots in a Greenlandic ornamental accessory called the nuilarmiut that has nothing to do with knitting — it’s an element of traditional formalwear made of glass beads that cover the shoulders and bust in a large collar of brightly patterned geometric designs. The nuilarmiut’s appearance in a 1930 Danish film and, later, on members of the Danish royal family seems to have inspired several Scandinavian knitwear designers to imitate the effect in wool. Three of the earliest known circular yoke patterns bore the name “Eskimo,” suggesting their common inspiration. In the 1940s, the Bohus Stickning company in Sweden made the yoke sweater a mid-century status symbol. The designers’ innovative and masterful color play broke entirely with traditional motifs and methods to create subtly shifting forms and juxtaposed hues, all rendered at extremely fine gauge in luxurious angora-blend yarns. Bohus sweaters were worn by royalty and cultural icons — and commanded prices to match. The knitters’ earnings supported many families during an economically difficult time. Cottage industries in Shetland and Iceland were also quick to capitalize on the international taste for yokes, channeling their potent knitting histories to create garments that became lucrative exports more accessible to the average pocket book.

The strategic position of the patterning on a circular yoke serves two purposes. The designs ring the throat and shoulders like jewelry, drawing attention to the face. The plain body and sleeves heighten this effect while slyly achieving a second end: all that unadorned fabric is easy and relatively speedy knitting. In the case of the famous Shetland yokes, many of which featured tree and star designs borrowed from neighboring Norway, the jumper bodies and sleeves were knit by machine and then passed to the handknitters for the colorwork portion. The sweaters could then be completed at a cracking pace to achieve a successful commercial scale, and the knitters could develop one beautiful variation after another by skillfully shading both the background and foreground colors. The Bohus sweaters were always knit entirely by hand, but even at 8 or 9 stitches to the inch, the plain bodies allowed the most accomplished knitters to complete a couture garment in just a few weeks. Icelandic production knitters still work by hand, but take advantage of their native sheep’s long-stapled fleeces to work at a loose large gauge that supports strong geometric motifs and rapid sweater completion.

Yokes have climbed to the height of fashion, plunged into outmoded fustiness, and ascended once again in recent decades. Across the North Atlantic, a resurgence of admiration for these powerful symbols of national identity has led younger generations to embrace them. Knitters around the world have been quick to appreciate the joy of crafting yokes; a basic circular yoke is one of the most foolproof sweaters to knit, and the possibilities for elaboration are endless.

Brooklyn Tweed pays homage to the bold beauty and variety of yoke designs in five sweaters and two accessories that tip the cap to history, but hew to modern fit principles and allow each designer to explore original ideas. In these pages you’ll find seamless construction (both bottom up and top down), stranded colorwork, cabled texture, and even a wink at classic cartoons. Welcome to BT Yokes.

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Winter is lingering long in Portland this year, but we’re choosing to see these days of near-freezing drizzle as a prompt to make the most of our knitwear. Warm weather still feels so far away that we’re more than happy to contemplate casting on another sweater, especially with the lure of a just-right portion of decorative stitchwork. That’s what we love about yoke designs: their perfect balance of carefree stockinette seasoned with a dash of colorwork or textural patterning. They’re fun to knit, easy to integrate into any wardrobe, and endlessly inviting when we want to experiment with color or cables. To share our enthusiasm, we’re releasing our themed collection for 2017 today: BT Yokes.

We drew inspiration from the sweaters of Iceland, Shetland, and Scandinavia — a history we enjoyed researching for a feature in our lookbook. Jared Flood’s Atlas (now sized for the whole family) nods to the lopapeysa; Véronik Avery elevates her Frostpeak colorwork with cunningly placed purl stitches, an idea pioneered by the Bohus Stickning designers of Sweden; Michele Wang’s Morse cowl stacks bands of small geometric motifs common to Shetland and Norway.

The beauty of yokes has always been their versatility as a canvas for anything a designer can dream up, so we haven’t been too faithful in our interpretations of the form. Some garments apply inventive shaping principles (wait till you see Julie Hoover’s newest take on raglan decreases) and motifs that owe more to Charlie Brown than to anything ever knit in the North Atlantic regions. Norah Gaughan’s flights of cabled fancy are iconic in and of themselves, and her full powers are on display in Tundra and Pyry.

A surprise storm system meant we had to be creative about staging our photoshoot for BT Yokes, but is there a more perfect backdrop for a collection of cozy woolens than a fresh blanket of snow? We hope you’ll enjoy browsing the new lookbook and making the most of the knitting weather.

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The season of twinkly lights, eggnog, and snowball fights is the most wonderful time of the year — for woolens!  Some of us are trying to calculate how many hours of sleep we can exchange for crafting time to eke out a few more handmade gifts; others are blissfully escaping the chaos by casting on a long-term project that has nothing to do with the holidays and stresses of the wider world. If you’re in either of these camps, or simply dreaming of your next adventure in knitting, we have a surprise for you today: BT Winter 17, dropping early this year!

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Our house designers have decked the halls with twelve new garments and four accessories that use all four of Brooklyn Tweed’s core yarn lines. This collection includes our very first garment designs for Arbor, our worsted-spun DK Targhee wool. We’re so excited to show you what this new yarn can do on a larger canvas! Jared Flood’s masculine Svenson pullover, Norah Gaughan’s Shoji cocoon cardigan, and Véronik Avery’s Nila lap-front pullover were designed to make the most of Arbor’s vivid stitch definition and drape.

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If you need gift-knitting inspiration, Winter 17 offers up several unisex accessories. The Lancet hat can be worked in chunky Quarry for soft, tweedy, practically instant results or in Arbor for crisply defined chevrons and a full, nuanced palette. The Proof hat and Proof scarf can be paired for perfectly matched winter warmth.

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If your world needs a meditative still point, the soothing stockinette of Julie Hoover’s Rivage coat or the hypnotic shifting textures of Michele Wang’s Binary scarf may do the trick.

This collection is all about cozy comfort trimmed with distinctive details and innovative textures. We hope you’ll find something in the new lookbook to brighten the season for yourself and your loved ones. Happy knitting!

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