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Hello knitters, and welcome to the penultimate week of our Winter of Colorwork KAL. Today we are talking about finishing tips and tricks for colorwork cardigans to ensure that each aspect of your knitted garment will wear well over time.

After steeking a cardigan you will need to add some much needed structure to the freshly cut edge by picking up and knitting the collar and button band. Your pattern will indicate how many stitches to pick up for each section of your cardigan, typically along the right front edge, right front neck, top of sleeves & back neck, left front neck, and left front edge. 

If you struggle with picking up the correct amount of stitches for a button band and collar, here is a trick you may find helpful; say your size in the pattern calls for you to pick up 67 stitches over 13 inches on your front edges, or about 5.1 stitches per inch (67 divided by 13). If your front edges measure 14.5 inches instead, for example, multiply your measurement times the stitches per inch (5.1) for a total of 74 stitches (rounded up) to pick up along each front edge.

TIP: Lay your sweater out flat and measure the front edges. If your front edges measure shorter or longer than the pattern schematic, adjust the number of stitches you are picking up in those sections. If your measurement matches the schematic for a different size, you can pick up the number of front edge stitches indicated for that size. 

Once your button band and collar are completed, you’ll next need to fasten down the edge of your steek stitches. This can be accomplished by either by tacking them down with a length of yarn and a darning needle to the inside of the cardigan, or by hand-sewing a length of Petersham or Grosgrain ribbon down each inside front edge after you’ve washed & blocked your sweater. We prefer to use Petersham ribbon, which can be found at most local yarn or fabric stores, as it resembles grosgrain ribbon but has a scalloped, flexible edge that allows it to lay smoothly around curves.

Finally, soak your cardigan and block it to the measurements outlined in the pattern schematic. A bath and a rest will let your yarn bloom, even out your colorwork, and let your sweater show off its true beauty. If you need a quick review of blocking, check out our Foundations: Blocking 101 post in our Resource Library.

When your sweater is nice and dry, sew on your buttons and wear with pride!

TIP: If using a flat button with holes instead of a toggle, sew your buttons on with a thread shank to allow room for the layer of fabric that you are buttoning through to fit comfortably under the button. Use a toothpick or darning needle as a spacer on top of your button as you sew. There are lots of great videos online to guide you!

Next week we will be wrapping up the Winter of Colorwork KAL and hope to see your finished garments! Be sure to share your work online with the hashtags below, and leave a comment here to let us know how your project went.

#BTWinterofColorwork #BTWinterofColorworkKAL

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Welcome back knitters, this week we’ll be talking all about the steps needed to join your Pascal sleeves to your sweater body and then begin working through the yoke – the final steps before steeking!

At this point you will have three knitted tubes to work with: two sleeve tubes, a right and a left, on waste yarn or stitch holders and a sweater body tube still live on your needles. To join these three pieces together first locate the “Union Round” section of your pattern, for the digital version of Pascal that will be page 10.

TIP: Lay your three knitted tubes out in front of you to make sure that you’re starting with the right sleeve and not the left – since you’re beginning your round on the front of your sweater, your right sleeve will be the first sleeve that you knit to.

After orienting yourself and your knitted tubes, pick up the sweater body and knit across the right front, your pattern will tell you exactly where to stop before you reach your stitch marker.

To form the right underarm, transfer the indicated number of body stitches to waste yarn or a stitch holder and remove the side marker – these live stitches will be grafted together later with live stitches from your right sleeve as a part of the finishing process. Next, place a new marker to indicate where your raglan shaping will be worked.

Now to join your first sleeve! Place your right sleeve stitches on a spare set of needles and remove the waste yarn or stitch holder that was keeping them in place, a short circular needle or set of DPNs work great for this task. Be sure to keep the separately held live stitches, those that will form the underarm, still on waste yarn or on a stitch holder to be grafted later.

To join these right sleeve stitches to your sweater body, simply knit across them taking care to maintain even tension on the strand of yarn that will now be connecting the sleeve and body together. Once you have worked across your sleeve stitches, place another raglan marker and knit across the back of your sweater body until the point in which your pattern instructs you to stop.

The left sleeve will be worked the same as the right sleeve; first you will transfer underarm stitches to waste yarn or a stitch holder, place a raglan marker, knit across the left sleeve stitches, place another raglan marker, and knit across the left front body stitches to complete the round.

And just like that, you’ve successfully joined your sleeves!

From the sleeve joining round to the final neck bind-off you will continue to work your sleeves and body stitches all on the same longer circular needle. This can feel like slow going at first since you’ll be working over more stitches now than you had before when working three smaller tubes, but rest assured that once you begin your raglan shaping things will begin to speed up again.

For Pascal, both single and double decreases are used for shaping the raglans: Knit 2 Together (K2tog) paired with a modified Slip Slip Knit (SSK), and Knit 3 Together (K3tog) paired with a modified Slip Slip Slip Knit (SSSK). You may be asking yourself, why use two different kinds of decreases? Well, K2tog and K3tog decreases lean to the right / while SSK and SSSK decreases lean to the left \ . In the illustration above, you can see that the right raglan shaping and left neckline both lean to the right, while the left raglan shaping and right neckline both lean to the left. We’ll use decreases that lean the same way to visually complement the slope of each section.

DID YOU KNOW: A raglan sleeve extends in one piece from the underarm to the collar, creating a diagonal seam. It is named after FitzRoy James Henry Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan, who after the loss of his right arm in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 wore this style of sleeve to allow extra range of motion for his remaining arm. In later knitting-related history, Baron Raglan was responsible for ordering James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan (for whom the sweater was named) to lead the infamous Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava (for which the headwear was named) in 1854.

Join us next week when we’ll dive into the world of steeking, and be another step closer to a wonderful wearable heirloom. Share your progress this week in the comments below or in the KAL forum on Ravelry!

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Hello again Winter of Colorwork KAL friends! We’re approaching the end of the first month of 2019 — can you believe it? — and have been making ample progress on our Pascal sweaters. Last week, we talked about the importance of swatching, things to keep in mind when casting on, and knitting up the sleeves for your Pascal. Once both of your sleeves are complete, it’s time to knit the sweater body.

Pascal’s body begins with a garter stitch welt hem. Although the body of the sweater is knit in the round, the hem is knit flat to eliminate the need to cut through any additional stitches, and reduces any bulk that would be created at the hem when tacking down the cut edge of your cardigan.

Once the hem is complete, steek stitches are cast on before joining the work in the round. The Backward Loop Cast On is often used for the purpose of casting on stitches for steeks because it’s an easy way to add stitches to fabric that is already established, and it is a loose cast on that is easy to cut through. Follow the instructions in the pattern (or below) to cast on the stitches called for in the pattern.

Make a slip knot on R needle to begin, now holding the needle with the slip knot in your right hand, *use the working yarn to make a loop around your left thumb, then place this loop onto the R needle; repeat from * until you have the required number of stitches on your needle.
If using this method to cast on stitches to a piece in progress, omit slip knot and begin at *.

Note: Alternating colors in the steek stitches, as called for in the pattern, will make it easier to identify which stitch will be the center of your steek when it comes time to secure and cut through the fabric.

Once you have your steek stitches established and begin to knit the sweater body in the round, continue working the pattern as written for your desired fit. Please note, the body and sleeves must end on the same chart round so that the pattern will be aligned correctly on the yoke. Keep this in mind as you complete the body of the sweater.

Next week we’ll be joining the sleeves and the body together to knit the yoke. This bottom-to-top method of construction is often used in colorwork patterns that are knit seamlessly in the round, and we think you’ll find our tutorial useful if you haven’t experienced this method of construction before.

Share your progress with us in the comments below or in the KAL forum on Ravelry, and do let us know if you have any questions about colorwork knitting or helpful tips you’d like to share.

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Let’s Knit Along!

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We’re so excited to finally start our Pascal Cardigans with you for our Winter of Colorwork KAL — are you?! Let’s get to it…

Cast On & Sleeves

This week we’re starting with the sleeves. They’re knit in the round, starting with a garter stitch band, so the Long Tail Cast On is a great choice to create a tidy edge.

But first — have you swatched in garter stitch, stockinette, and colorwork to determine the needle sizes you’ll need?

14 stitches & 22 rounds = 4″ in stockinette stitch with Size A needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 6 mm (US 10)
14 stitches & 20 rounds = 4″ in colorwork chart patterns with Size B needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 6.5 mm (US 10½)
14 stitches & 32 rows = 4″ in garter stitch with Size C needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 5.5 mm (US 9)

(Your colorwork fabric should be swatched, wet-blocked, and measured when dry to determine whether Size B should be larger, smaller, or equal to Size A. We recommend Speed-Swatching for Circular Knitting, described in the Special Techniques section of your Pascal pattern and in our Swatching 101 article.)

Check your pattern schematic before casting on to see if you’ll need to lengthen or shorten your sleeves. Remember to take yoke depth into account – the deeper the yoke, the farther down your body the armholes reach, so the wrist-to-armhole length of your sleeves will be shorter. (Pascal’s yoke and armholes are a few inches deeper than you’d find on a slim fitted pullover, for example.)

Tip: You’ll need to make any length adjustments before reaching the colorwork section of your sleeves, so that the colorwork will line up on the sleeves and body of your sweater. Don’t worry – if you finish your sweater and discover your sleeve length isn’t quite right, it’s easy to fix!

Cast on your sleeve with your Size C needle for the garter stitch cuff, switch to your Size A needle to knit the main portion of your sleeve in stockinette, then switch again to your Size B needle for the colorwork section.

Colorwork Tips

Before starting your colorwork section, read about color dominance and maintaining even float tension in our Stranded Colorwork 101 article.

The column to the side of each of the colorwork charts in Pascal illustrates which colors should be held in which position so that the colorwork motif will stand out from the background.

The dominant color should always be stranded below the background color. If you hold one color in each hand, the easiest way to manage color dominance is to hold the dominant color in your left hand and bring it from it below the background color (held in your right hand) on the WS of the fabric. If you hold both colors in the same hand, be sure that your dominant color yarn is always coming from below your background color yarn.

In the example above, the light colored motif will stand out against the dark colored background. If you have a dark motif on a light background, be extra careful to maintain color dominance so that your dark color doesn’t visually recede. Following the color dominance guide in your pattern will ensure that your colorwork pops!

Note that there is a separate colorwork chart for each Pascal sleeve – mark each sleeve as you finish it so you can tell the left sleeve from the right.

Once each sleeve is complete, transfer your stitches to a holder or to waste yarn – then you’re ready to knit the body!

Happy knitting!

How to Knit Along

For our Winter of Colorwork KAL, we’ll be knitting the Pascal cardigan from our Winter 19 collection – but you can choose any pattern you like! We’ll share our tips and techniques for working each part of the cardigan — choosing colors, swatching for stranded colorwork, sweater construction, and steeking, to name a few.

Choose your favorite yarn and knitting project that features stranded colorwork. (The project should be knit using Brooklyn Tweed yarn, worked from a Brooklyn Tweed pattern, or both.) If you already have a WIP, feel free to join the KAL to finish your project or ask us questions if you’re stuck.

• Check with your local yarn store to see if they have classes or meet ups scheduled for the KAL.
• Follow the Winter of Colorwork KAL thread in the Brooklyn Tweed Fan Club forum on Ravelry.
• Read our weekly blog posts for each week’s tips and techniques — no matter your knitting pace!

Next week: Part 4 — Begin the Body!

#BTWinter19

#BTWinterofColorworkKAL

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A great variety of knitting patterns are now more available and accessible than ever before, thanks in part to online pattern databases and publishing houses dedicated to knitting patterns — in Brooklyn Tweed’s library alone there are more than 500 patterns. With so many options to choose from, now is a great time to expand your current skill set and venture off into uncharted knitting territory! (Or shall we say, charted knitting territory?)

In Anatomy of a Brooklyn Tweed Pattern, the sixth installment of our Foundations series, we walk you through the information and resources that we provide in our patterns to ensure you have a well-informed and successful knitting experience, whatever the skill level the pattern may be.

Today we offer additional tips to help you build confidence with your craft — and boldly tackle that intricate lace, cabled, or brioche piece, or perhaps even your first seamed or colorwork garment.

(Patterns clockwise from top: Huck, To the Point, Hayward)

Remember that Skill Level ratings are not meant to be restrictive. A knitter who identifies as an advanced knitter may still be stumped by a pattern and one who identifies as a beginner may have few issues following the same pattern — so don’t feel intimidated by a higher skill rating!

In general, our Skill Level rating system is aimed toward giving you at-a-glance information on the types of techniques or construction methods that may be involved in the pattern, rather than being a hard and fast determiner of the types of patterns that you yourself can tackle. In Anatomy of a Brooklyn Tweed Pattern we break down the criteria we follow when assigning Skill Levels to our patterns. We also provide information on the construction of the item and the techniques involved in the pattern (both required and optional), so you know what to expect and can assess how this information meets your skill set long before you cast on.

Gather your resources. The great thing about knowing before casting on what construction methods and techniques are involved in the pattern is that you can prepare yourself by gathering your resources — be they a guide to abbreviations for common knitting terms, instructional videos on how to perform a certain stitch or finishing technique, or notes other knitters have provided about their experience working with the pattern.

Having these resources in one easily accessible place (perhaps as a collection of printed-out material or as bookmarks on your web browser) can be extremely handy when you find yourself stuck on a certain section of the pattern. You can also consult these resources to practice before starting your project.

Feeling well-supported is critical to a successful knitting experience. As such, we always provide in our patterns written instructions for the special techniques involved (whether required or optional) along with a handy list of abbreviations for the knitting terms and stitches used. Our abbreviations “dictionary” also includes written instructions on how to perform the particular stitches they stand for. In this way, you can be sure that your pattern and pattern resources are already assembled in one package.

(Patterns from Left to Right: Grove Mittens, Agnes)

Trust the process (and the instructions). One of the many magical things about knitting is that you’re creating your fabric itself, while also manipulating it to look, fit, or behave a certain way. Inherent to this method of making is a little bit of mystery — even with a schematic, you may not actually see how a piece will be shaped until you’re in the moment of shaping it, or what it will look like in its entirety until you’ve finished it. (Sock knitters, remember what it was like when you first turned a heel.) So, try to place your trust in the process and the pattern instructions. You can rest easy knowing that our tech editors and proofers work tirelessly to make our patterns as clear, concise, and reliable as possible.

Know that it’s OK to substitute techniques. There may be a simpler way to accomplish a specific technique — and these are often provided in our patterns — so don’t be afraid to substitute them to fit your comfort level. Some examples are working a Long-Tail Cast On instead of a Tubular Cast On or binding off normally instead of working a Sloped Bind Off. Some techniques may also have multiple variations. For example, some knitters prefer to work wrapless Short Rows instead of the Wrap and Turn method, or work a Long-Tail Tubular Cast On instead of the standard Tubular Cast On involving waste yarn. Play around, experiment, and practice multiple variations on techniques to find the method that works best for your knitting style.

In a similar vein, you can draw upon techniques you’ve worked in previous projects to evaluate how you can utilize them in a seemingly different application. For example, if you’re a cuff-down sock knitter who often grafts toes with a Kitchener Stitch, you’re all set to work a Tubular Bind Off!

Allow yourself to make mistakes. Many of us may develop a perfectionist streak throughout our knitting careers. While quality and perfection are worthwhile goals to strive for, it is still helpful and kind to allow yourself the room to make — and learn from — mistakes. It’s also helpful to determine what kinds of mistakes you can live with and what you can’t, so you can more judiciously allocate your time and effort.

In the words of Lela Nargi, author of Knitting Memories: Reflections on the Knitter’s Life, “There are no mistakes, only design opportunities.”

(Patterns from Left to Right: Yishu, Freja (To be released with Winter 18)

Practice new techniques on a smaller project. Try starting with something small, like a hat or a cowl. This way, you can practice and experiment in a more manageable way, and without the pressure of more yardage or fit considerations. The bonus is that accessories can be quite versatile and practical additions to your wardrobe rotation.

Ask for help. Don’t forget to ask for help when you need it. Your fellow knitters at your local yarn store, in your knitting group, or on Ravelry will be happy to help you if you get stuck. We also offer online pattern support for all Brooklyn Tweed patterns so always feel free to drop us a note at support@brooklyntweed.com.

Take notes. When trying something new, it’s always helpful to document your process, the issues you encountered, and how you solved them, either in a separate notebook or on the pattern itself (whether on paper or the PDF copy) — we leave plenty of negative space in our patterns for this reason! In this way, you can become a resource for yourself when you take on future projects.

Take a break. If you feel like you’ve been stuck at a certain point in a pattern too long for your liking, feel free to set your project aside for a moment. While we all want to be able to tackle a challenge immediately, it’s important not to overstretch our limits. As such, rest your mind (and hands) every now and again so you’ll have renewed energy and a fresher perspective when you return to your project.

Most importantly, have fun and keep at it. We all start somewhere — and knitting is a life-long learning experience!

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The Scandinavian-inspired Galloway cardigan is the perfect blank canvas for knitters wanting to explore “painting with yarn.” Stranded garments that use four colors, like this one, offer a staggering range of possibilities for how your finished sweater looks; the colorway shown in our photos is just one of hundreds of ways you could interpret the design.

When Jared was creating this garment, he tested many color combinations and came up with a total of eight color combinations to get your gears turning. We’re also providing some resources about hue and value to help you make informed color decisions for your own project.

Understanding Color

Generally speaking, the goal of selecting a color palette for colorwork knitting is to ensure the pattern will be easily discernible in the finished fabric, and not muddied or lost among neighboring colors.

Both the hue and value of a color are essential considerations in determining how successful your chosen colorway will be. Simply put, value refers to a color’s relative degree of lightness or darkness (picture a greyscale) and hue is the noticeable attribute of a color (redness, greenness, etc.)

If these terms or concepts are new to you, check out an in-depth explanation about hue and value in Jared’s post about color theory.

Color Values in the Shelter Palette

Above we’ve shown the Shelter palette broken down into three value categories: dark, medium, and light.

In the Galloway pattern, four colors are used to knit the cardigan. Selecting the background color first (C1 in Galloway) will allow you to make better decisions about the rest of your palette, so we recommend you start there.

Selecting colors from all three categories (light, medium, and dark) is always the best approach to stranded colorwork, especially with smaller motifs. When yarns from all three categories are represented, the pattern will have visual “pop.” Alternatively, if multiple colors of very similar values are used, pattern motifs will be difficult to discern.

To give you a sense of the different values used in our samples, we’ve written them down for you here. Use the value categories, corresponding colorways, and the samples listed below as a guide to mix and match your own combinations.

As you can see, some of the mid-values may be used as darks because their hue is so strong/bright that they will hold their own against dark neutrals. With color, everything depends on relative combinations — meaning rules can often be broken — but using the dark/medium/light value approach is a great starting point for color planning, especially if these concepts are new for you.

Compare Colors on Our Website

 

Our yarn product pages feature a useful “Compare Colors” feature aimed to help knitters in color selection. On the Shelter yarn page, select the Compare Colors button just above the color selection box. Once open you can select the colors in the palette and reorganize or remove them to view colors side-by-side.

Additional Color Palette Inspiration

The Grettir pullover also requires four colors of Shelter to knit. For additional color palette inspiration on a similar-style project to Galloway, check out the Grettir projects knit with Shelter on Ravelry.

Speed Swatching for Circular Knitting

Once you’ve made a decision about a final colorway using the above information, it’s time to swatch and test your choices! In knitting, there is simply no substitution for knitting a swatch to see how the finished fabric will appear, and this has never been more true with colorwork. Even experienced colorwork knitters sometimes are surprised by their results with a given color combination after swatching, and it’s always better to be surprised — whether positively or otherwise — on a swatch than on your finished garment!

The Galloway pattern includes instructions on how to speed swatch in the round for colorwork patterns. After swatching, you may find that you need to swap the position of two or more of your colors to achieve a more visually interesting fabric, or even replace one or more of your initial choices to finesse a fabric that needs a touch more contrast.

(And even if you’re using one of our pre-selected color palettes, speed swatching is still important in order to ensure you’re getting gauge!)

We’re Here to Help

Although the Galloway pattern is considered advanced, the required techniques are described at length in the pattern and we’re always here to help. You can reach us on Ravelry in the Brooklyn Tweed Fan Club group or email our pattern support specialist directly at support@brooklyntweed.com. Perhaps you’ll challenge yourself to knit this eye-catching colorwork cardigan during the BT Fall 17 KAL. If so, we’ll be right there with you every step of the way.

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We’re celebrating independence and collaboration with the release of Wool People 11 today! We always enjoy the chance our Wool People project offers to work alongside independent designers, both new and established — there’s a sense of fresh energy and perspective in combing through the hundreds of submissions we receive for these collections and in bringing the selected designs to life.

This issue feels extra special because it incorporates our two newest yarns, Arbor and Vale. Next week we’ll do a feature on the Vale accessories and share the designers’ thoughts about working with our new laceweight. But before we delve into the wonderful world of lace and kick off our Summer of Lace KAL, we want to talk about the Wool People 11 garments. There are eight gorgeous sweaters in three different yarns, and what really stands out to us is the diversity of fabrics the designers have achieved in these wearable, flattering pieces.

For cozy bundling in the light but warm stockinette that Shelter creates, Ann Klimpert and Andrea Mowry present Rivet and Ronan. Both of these long-length cardigans rely on Shelter’s airy, woolen-spun nature to stay versatile and hold their shape despite their large swathes of fabric. Rivet has a vintage feel, while Ronan’s is a totally modern silhouette with a collar in fluffy brioche.

For those who like a trim and classic pullover, Mossbank and Bell give a twist to timeless layering pieces by using mostly reverse stockinette fabric. The pebbly texture of the purl side is a great way to set off softly rounded cables in a woolen-spun yarn, as Ann McCauley chose to do with Bell. Kerry Robb was inspired by the back side of her swatch in our Newsprint marl, realizing that the bumps blend the contrasting colors into an inviting heathery haze.

Loft in garter stitch is total comfort fabric, and triangular shawls like Nancy Whitman’s Level are comfort wear. For cool summer evenings when you want to linger outdoors, this graphic layer is the remedy. Level’s inventive construction and a dab of intarsia make the knitting sprightlier than usual for a garter triangle. If you’ve got a summer road trip planned, we think light and packable Loft shawls make good travel companions as knitting projects and as finished pieces.

One reason we’ve been so excited to add Arbor to our core yarn line is that it’s entirely different from our woolen-spun yarns. Besides being stronger, denser, and smoother, Arbor is rounder. Its third ply makes the yarn cylindrical rather than helical, and its tighter twist keeps those three plies completely engaged in a happy ménage. Arbor’s stitches don’t blend in amongst their neighbors; they stand proud and individual. And that means we can knit fabrics with more dimension and more vivid texture.

Four of our Wool People designers put Arbor through its paces with very different approaches. Melissa Wehrle uses a simple all-over texture of knits and purls to create a waffly fabric for Harlowe, and a relaxed gauge allows the sweater to drape beautifully. Yoko Hatta’s sculptural Akiko cardigan shows the yarn’s affinity for cables and contrasts moss stitch fronts with a clean plane of fluid stockinette on the back. Olga Buraya-Kefelian opts for a modern, high-impact ribbing treatment to elevate her Boundary mock turtleneck. And Emily Greene pulls out all the stops with panels of directional half-twisted rib in her Divide pullover.

Are you ready to swatch some new fabrics to add to your closet? We hope you find inspiration in the talent and vision of the Wool People designers. Take some time with the new lookbook and let us know what’s calling your name!

 

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Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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The tailoring trade is a bottomless well of inspiration. Attention to detail, canny consideration of each fabric’s properties, pursuit of a perfect fit — at Brooklyn Tweed we hew to the same principles in our design work. Knowing we’d shoot this collection on the premises of Wildwood & Company, a bespoke tailoring studio in downtown Portland, we took our inspiration from fine examples of classic menswear.

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Our mission for Fall 2016 was to create pairs of designs — one for him and one for her — that spring from a single concept. In some instances, small adjustments to the fit distinguish the two versions; in other cases a shift in scale or a major alteration to the garment’s shape achieves distinct but related looks.

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Three of the collection’s patterns — SpearheadsPavo, and Vika — bundle both versions as they are variations on the same pattern model. Since each version of the remainder of the collection was written independently in order to account for the nuances of tailoring to fit bodies of differing proportions, each version of these patterns is sold separately. Whether you’re in the mood to knit an understated pullover or a chunky statement piece, we’ve put together a collection that suits a wide range of fit and styling preferences. Cables, texture, a splash of colorwork — it’s all here.

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All Fall 16 patterns are now available for download on our website and on Ravelry. You’ll notice we’ve updated our pattern layout, too — we hope you’ll find the new format clear and supportive as you knit your next BT garment.

 

We invite you to leaf through our new lookbook and stay awhile in the cool and tranquil atmosphere of Wildwood & Company. Welcome, all, and welcome, fall!

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Wool People 10 Cover

 

Welcome, Wool People! We’re thrilled to introduce a tenth collection of garments and accessories conceived by independent designers and curated by Brooklyn Tweed. This edition was the first opportunity for Wool People to make full use of our current stable of yarns, and we were particularly excited to see what the creative minds of the knitting world would imagine in Plains, our limited-edition laceweight Rambouillet.

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With half the collection being floaty lace accessories, it only seemed right to balance things out with the pleasing structure and heft of cables, so you’ll find chunky coats and mid-weight sweaters aplenty in this well-rounded collection. As the seasons are turning all around the globe, we love the thought of a knitter in New Zealand casting on a cozy cardi like Marylebone while another here in Portland is starting a lace crescent like Haro or Lunette to wear over tees and sundresses (or getting a jumpstart on a new cableknit wardrobe staple for next fall!).

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Our contributors are a wonderful mix of new and familiar faces from around the planet. One of our favorite aspects of Wool People is the open submission call that puts budding design talent on the same stage with established luminaries. Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting brief interviews with the designers whose work is appearing in Wool People for the first time, and we hope you’ll enjoy getting to know them.

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We also look forward to sharing some scenes from Saco River Dyehouse, one of our partners in producing Plains, to show you more about this yarn’s journey to your needles.

Enjoy the collection!

 


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