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There’s always extra room in our knitting bags for a hat that offers a relaxing knitting experience coupled with great style. With this in mind, we asked Brooklyn-based architect and knitwear designer Emily Greene to design our first Outpost pattern, and her wonderful unisex Hatch Hat really checks both boxes for us.

Requiring only the most basic of stitches (knit, purl, and simple decreases), Hatch is a fun and friendly pattern. Aside from a few transition rounds which might require your attention, the project’s ease and simplicity will allow you to knit while carrying on a conversation with friends or simply let your mind get into the meditative rhythm of the ribbing. Since the crown shaping can be worked from either the chart or written directions, we think everyone will be happy with this easy people-pleaser of a pattern.

Knit in texture-enhancing Arbor as either a beanie or classic watchcap, Hatch’s columned fabric opens up beautifully as it stretches slightly about the head. Its orderly progression through a scale of ribbings may make it the perfect topper for mathematical or engineering minds to knit (or receive)!

Intrigued? To tempt you further, for the month of October we’re offering Hatch with a little extra fanfare: as a kit in your choice of 30 timeless colors.

Should you, too decide to devote a little corner of your knitting bag to Hatch, we’d love to see your progress — you can share with the hashtag #HatchHat. We can’t wait to see your Hatches!

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The cooler months here in Portland, Oregon often find our hardy locals eschewing umbrellas to brave the rain in hoodies, and our obvious choice against the local elements is a knit hat tucked into a pocket or bag. Wanting this workhorse to serve faithfully through capricious downpours as well as fashion trends, we look for versatile hat patterns we trust. Our go-to lately has been Mawson, a watch cap released last summer to commemorate the launch of Shelter’s three marled hues.

During the crush of last year’s gift knitting season in our office — we lovingly called it our “Mawson holiday” — the BT crew knit a total of 12 Mawson hats. It wasn’t long before we reached for Arbor to try a modification of the original, and we wanted to share it with you, too.

Arbor’s Mawson uses the exact directions as the original Shelter version (the stretchy ribbed fabric makes for a standard fit for both DK and worsted weight yarns), and we even riffed a bit on the original, adding a half-twisted rib* version to highlight the worsted-spun stitch definition. As a slightly more fitted hat, the Arbor version makes a great foil against the wind. And a palette of 30 shades offers a chance for a sophisticated nod to a favorite piece of outerwear or even a beloved alma mater.

Even if you’re not as adventurous as the pattern’s namesake Australian explorer, Mawson’s rib cable cast on and unique double decreases may still bring you a few new discoveries in your knitting. Special crown decreases lay flat and make the hat completely reversible, while also forming a distinct three-legged crown shaping. (Andriknitsalot of Ravelry keenly observed the resemblance to a trillium flower.)

The humble back-and-forth of Mawson’s one knit, one purl stitch combo — any way you twist it — is both relaxing and handsome. Along with providing a meditative knitting process, it gives the fabric enough stretchiness and structure to allow slouch without flop.

We’re not sure yet which patterns will go viral across our BT knitting bags this fall, but this is one we have our eyes on as our thoughts turn happily to cooler weather!

* Our half-twisted rib variation simply involves working all the knit stitches TBL (through the back loop) on all even-numbered rounds. In other words, twist your knit stitches every other round to achieve this distinctive variation.

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Introducing three new Quarry colors, just in time for winter knitting. Garnet and Lapis add brightness to the existing mineral-based hues, and Granite rounds out our grey and black palette, complementing Moonstone, Slate, and Obsidian.

To see these new colors knit up, we’ve re-knit Burnaby, Lancet, and Halus (shown above from right to left). Each hat can be knit with just one skein of Quarry — pick your new favorite color and knit away!

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Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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We’re thrilled to unveil an all-new 100% American yarn today! It’s long been our goal to expand the range of Brooklyn Tweed offerings, but a great deal of planning, care, and time are required to build lasting partnerships, source everything domestically, and make sure our supply chain is robust enough to meet customer demand. Arbor has been in the works for more than a year — it’s entirely different from our woolen-spun core lines and its journey from sheep to skein is wholly new.

The fiber

Arbor comes from purebred Targhee sheep grazing the rangelands of Montana and South Dakota. The Targhee is an American breed, based on Rambouillet stock but augmented with Corriedale and Lincoln longwool for strength. Targhee yarn knits up as supple, long-wearing fabric that’s luxuriously soft but everyday durable.

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The Milling Process

We send our Targhee clip to the historic Jagger Brothers Spinning Mill in southern Maine for worsted processing. This yarn is not the rustic jumble of lightly twisted fibers you’ve come to expect from Brooklyn Tweed. Worsted spinning involves combing all the fibers into smooth alignment before spinning to produce a perfectly even roving. Arbor is a bouncy, round 3-ply yarn with a tight twist for superior stitch definition and strength.

The Palette

We wanted Arbor to be a celebration of color with a deep, nuanced range of hues. From the velvety depths of Nightfall and Dorado to the blaze of Firebrush and the tang of Tincture, our custom-dyed solids span the spectrum. The neutrals offer unexpected twists — the faded black denim of Porter, the subtle warm tones of Humpback, the lichen green of Gale, the barely-there blush of pink in Degas. A few of our favorites from the Plains palette — Morandi, Rainier, and Treehouse — now have a permanent home in the Arbor line. These colors are created with minimal impact on the environment by the master dyers at Saco River Dyehouse, the country’s only organically certified yarn dyeing operation.

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The Collection

To introduce this new yarn, Jared Flood has created a tasting menu of accessories that will let you sample Arbor in bite-size projects or wrap yourself in rich color at a larger scale. Some of the patterns are familiar favorites from the Brooklyn Tweed archives reworked for Arbor’s gauge and unique characteristics; others are fresh offerings. The Arbor Collection includes nine patterns for hats, scarves, shawls, and cowls that sing the yarn’s praises in cables, twisted stitches, and textural motifs. With gift knitting season upon us, we hope you’ll find inspiration in our new lookbook for treating your knitworthy loved ones.

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We’re so excited about our new partnerships in the U.S. textile industry that have allowed us to bring you Arbor, and we hope it will find a home in your workbasket. We can’t wait to hear what you think and to see what you’ll make.

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One of Jared’s intentions in creating his Woolens collection was to introduce a variety of knitting techniques in approachable projects. The book is meant to be accessible to new knitters, but also to coax veterans of the craft into expanding their skill sets. For today’s blog we’d like to highlight four projects that just might teach you something new.

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Seeds Hats

This basic stockinette cap was conceived as a gentle introduction to stranded colorwork. Only six rounds (eight, if you work the largest size) require both colors at once, and those rounds sport a pattern that alternates colors every stitch so you’ll never need to worry about tensioning longer floats. The pattern is written for tubular cast on, a beautiful technique that’s well worth learning, but a simpler method can be substituted if you’re just starting out or if you’re short on time. Seeds is also a great canvas for playing with color combinations — Jared has written blog posts about color theory that may help you pick the perfect trio, but there’s no better way to learn about hue and value than to pull some leftovers from your stash and audition them in a quick “swatch cap.”

 

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Byway

Ready to try cables? This wrap is worked end to end in easily memorized patterning; the simple six-stitch cables are mirrored, so you can practice crossing with stitches held to the front and to the back, and the blocks of garter stitch flanking the cables will help you keep track of your work and recognize when it’s time for another cabling row. You may even decide you’re ready to try cabling without a cable needle before the end — stitches in woolen-spun Shelter won’t easily run down and escape while they’re momentarily free. As a bonus, Byway will teach you a nifty flat-lying selvedge you’ll want to apply to other projects.

 

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Halo

Lace knitting can seem intimidating or too fussy for knitters who enjoy the meditative rhythm of just motoring through a basic stitch pattern. We encourage you to test the waters with Halo, a pi shawl with rings of eyelets that are easy to work and to memorize. There’s plain knitting aplenty in the sea of stockinette that flows out from the center cast-on, and a gentle step toward more difficulty in the edging chart. If charts make your knees knock, never fear: this one is small, clear, and simple — and the legend is printed right beneath it.

 

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Crosshatch

Brioche stitch is all the rage for good reasons: it’s addictively rhythmic to knit, delightfully squishy, and full of airy warmth. Working in two colors reveals its architecture and prints the fabric with a graphic herringbone pattern — and the two yarns are worked alternately, so it’s less difficult than it looks. Crosshatch exaggerates the brioche texture by combining yarns of different weights as well as different colors. And the pattern lets you dial in a comfortable level of challenge by choosing between a simple garter selvedge and a more complex edging that perfectly matches the fabric.

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We hope you’ll enjoy adding to your knitter’s toolkit with these projects and others from Woolens! Please share your projects with #BTWoolens so we can savor your interpretations of these accessories. And let us know in the comments what you’ve enjoyed learning lately or what skills you’re hoping to acquire next!

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Announcing Woolens, Jared’s first printed book and single-designer collection since Made In Brooklyn seven years ago! Most knitters cut their teeth on simple accessories like scarves and hats. And for most of us there’s comfort and satisfaction in returning to such projects even after we’ve expanded our skills to become garment knitters. Maybe we need something finite to whip up for a friend’s birthday, or maybe we just want an uncomplicated palate cleanser after a strenuous cabled coat or a colorwork sweater. In homage to soothing, approachable knits, Jared decided to design a whole collection of accessories in his thoughtful, timeless style.

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The eleven cowls, scarves, wraps and hats in Woolens introduce a variety of techniques and invite exploration of various design options, prompting choices that personalize the garments. Created with masculine and feminine wardrobes in mind, these pieces meld classic good looks and engaging knitting. Many are simple enough for the adventurous beginner; if you’re ready to expand your skill set, try a hat designed as the gentlest possible introduction to stranded colorwork. When you’re ready for another level of challenge, knit a striking bi-color shawl that’s worked in the round and opened with a steek. With a clear and thorough reference section that’s a valuable resource in itself, Woolens will teach you all the new techniques you need to knit these beautiful accessories.

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Throughout this 138-page book, Jared’s gorgeous photographs reveal every detail of the designs as well as glimpses of his creative process and inspiration from the natural beauty of Japan. We hope you’ll soak up of plenty of inspiration for your next project — accessories make great gifts, after all — and enjoy the tactile experience of a BT collection on paper!

Woolens is available as a printed book or as a print + e-book combo and can be purchased right here on our website or from Brooklyn Tweed stockists around the world. As a special treat, the first 250 copies of the book sold online will be signed by the author. We hope you enjoy this inspiring new publication!

 


Quick Links:

Purchase a Print Book   |   Purchase a Print+E-Book Combo  |  View Individual Pattern Information

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Today we’re excited to introduce three marled colorways to our worsted-weight Shelter line! Marls are created by combining plies of different colors together in a single strand of yarn; we paired a ply of white wool with a ply of neutral brown, black and grey to create Caribou, Newsprint and Narwhal. These beautiful yarns give finished fabrics a mottled texture and depth that brings classic sophistication to simple fabrics like stockinette, garter stitch  and ribbing.

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We’re welcoming the Shelter Marls with a brand new hat pattern for both men and women, designed by Jared Flood. Mawson includes directions for a standard beanie (shown right in Newsprint) or a slouchy version (shown left in Narwhal) which can also be worn with a doubled brim as a classic watchcap. For a limited time, receive the digital pattern free with a purchase of one or more skeins of your favorite Shelter Marl (1 skein is required for the beanie version, 2 skeins for the slouchy version). Through August 22, 2016 a coupon for the free pattern will ship with your order, redeemable at brooklyntweed.com.

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Mawson has been designed with a few thoughtful details to make the knitting enjoyable — a Ribbed Cable Cast On gives the appearance of a tubular edge without the fussiness of working a full Tubular Cast On. The crown shaping incorporates a special ribbed double decrease that is completely reversible, so that hat looks just as good with RS or WS out. The slouchy version can be worn as a classic watchcap by doubling the brim as shown above.

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We hope you enjoy these new additions to our yarn family — we can’t wait to see what beautiful projects you create!

 

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Last year the Brooklyn Tweed design team hatched the idea of setting a regular design challenge for ourselves — a chance for all five of us to throw down our best ideas interpreting a particular historical genre in knitwear. First up? Ganseys!

 

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These historical seaman’s sweaters of the British Isles were not only practical garments, worked densely to guard the wearer against the North Sea elements; they also featured ingenious construction to improve comfort and durability. Frequently embellished with bold textural motifs, they were canvases for knitters’ skill and artistry, and as a whole gave rise to a cottage industry that helped to support families.

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In seeking inspiration from this rich tradition, we sought to incorporate the elements that most fascinate us—striking stitch motifs, the sense of balance between patterned and plain fabric, the innovative adjustments to fit—while updating garment shapes and bending to modern knitterly realities. (Few of us nowadays want to knit adult-size sweaters in black wool at 8 stitches to the inch!)

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Today we launch five new sweater patterns in Loft and Shelter, plus a quick-knitting cap in Quarry. Each design riffs on different points of gansey styling; we look forward to highlighting some of those special details when we blog about our approach to this collection next week. BT Ganseys offer a variety of silhouettes, so whether you prefer a trim fit, a cozy oversize shape, or a dash of funky flare, we hope you’ll find a sweater that appeals.

Hats

We also took the opportunity to restyle two hats from the BT archive to accompany this collection. We knit up Forge (shown above), a folded-brim watch cap marked by OXO cables and an elfin peak (shown above), in Fauna. Crag (shown in Artifact with the Vanora pullover), has been worked to a beanie length slightly shorter than the original, a modification that’s now been added to the pattern. (If you’ve previously purchased Crag electronically, you’ll receive a free update.)

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As always, we look forward to seeing how you’ll make these new designs your own! If you’re already a gansey connoisseur, maybe we’ll see you adding initials to the fabric of your sweater or deploying a Channel Island cast-on. If you’re new to the history of ganseys, we hope you’ll enjoy learning more about this rich knitting tradition. Happy knitting!

 

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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We’ve been looking forward to the clean slate of January, which brings with it a fresh year and a sense of calm after the hectic holidays. Our gift knitting is done and dusted and we can’t wait to cast on ambitious new projects for ourselves. So in the spirit of new beginnings, it’s with great excitement that we announce our Winter 16 collection.

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Whether you’re in the mood for a lace shawl or a long coat, a quick hat or a chunky pullover, you just might find your next project among these eleven garments and five accessories. Inspired by modern minimalism and everyday wearability, this collection celebrates the stark beauty of the season with clean lines and simple shapes.

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Winter 16 features all three of our core yarns — Shelter, Loft, and Quarry — and we’re also unveiling a very special surprise: a brand new, single-batch laceweight wool we call Plains. It’s our first foray into collaboration with new partners to offer intensely local, limited edition batches. We worked with the team at Mountain Meadow Wool Mill in Buffalo, Wyoming to develop this lively two-ply laceweight that celebrates the unique qualities of the American Rambouillet fleece. Worsted-spun for strength and stitch definition, this downy soft wool is perfect for next-to-skin wear and takes blocking beautifully despite its elasticity. (Read the full story on this exciting new project in the lookbook.)

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Plains is available for purchase on our website, along with all the new patterns. This small-batch yarn won’t be carried in stores and once it’s gone there won’t be anymore. Since the put-up is a generous 440 yards, you can knit a project in just one or two skeins. If you’d like to try this bouncy, slightly rustic yarn, it’s available online for as long as our supply lasts!

We hope the New Year brings you good knitting. We can’t wait to see what you’ll make of our new collection and with our newest yarn!

 

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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