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Winter is lingering long in Portland this year, but we’re choosing to see these days of near-freezing drizzle as a prompt to make the most of our knitwear. Warm weather still feels so far away that we’re more than happy to contemplate casting on another sweater, especially with the lure of a just-right portion of decorative stitchwork. That’s what we love about yoke designs: their perfect balance of carefree stockinette seasoned with a dash of colorwork or textural patterning. They’re fun to knit, easy to integrate into any wardrobe, and endlessly inviting when we want to experiment with color or cables. To share our enthusiasm, we’re releasing our themed collection for 2017 today: BT Yokes.

We drew inspiration from the sweaters of Iceland, Shetland, and Scandinavia — a history we enjoyed researching for a feature in our lookbook. Jared Flood’s Atlas (now sized for the whole family) nods to the lopapeysa; Véronik Avery elevates her Frostpeak colorwork with cunningly placed purl stitches, an idea pioneered by the Bohus Stickning designers of Sweden; Michele Wang’s Morse cowl stacks bands of small geometric motifs common to Shetland and Norway.

The beauty of yokes has always been their versatility as a canvas for anything a designer can dream up, so we haven’t been too faithful in our interpretations of the form. Some garments apply inventive shaping principles (wait till you see Julie Hoover’s newest take on raglan decreases) and motifs that owe more to Charlie Brown than to anything ever knit in the North Atlantic regions. Norah Gaughan’s flights of cabled fancy are iconic in and of themselves, and her full powers are on display in Tundra and Pyry.

A surprise storm system meant we had to be creative about staging our photoshoot for BT Yokes, but is there a more perfect backdrop for a collection of cozy woolens than a fresh blanket of snow? We hope you’ll enjoy browsing the new lookbook and making the most of the knitting weather.

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Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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The season of twinkly lights, eggnog, and snowball fights is the most wonderful time of the year — for woolens!  Some of us are trying to calculate how many hours of sleep we can exchange for crafting time to eke out a few more handmade gifts; others are blissfully escaping the chaos by casting on a long-term project that has nothing to do with the holidays and stresses of the wider world. If you’re in either of these camps, or simply dreaming of your next adventure in knitting, we have a surprise for you today: BT Winter 17, dropping early this year!

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Our house designers have decked the halls with twelve new garments and four accessories that use all four of Brooklyn Tweed’s core yarn lines. This collection includes our very first garment designs for Arbor, our worsted-spun DK Targhee wool. We’re so excited to show you what this new yarn can do on a larger canvas! Jared Flood’s masculine Svenson pullover, Norah Gaughan’s Shoji cocoon cardigan, and Véronik Avery’s Nila lap-front pullover were designed to make the most of Arbor’s vivid stitch definition and drape.

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If you need gift-knitting inspiration, Winter 17 offers up several unisex accessories. The Lancet hat can be worked in chunky Quarry for soft, tweedy, practically instant results or in Arbor for crisply defined chevrons and a full, nuanced palette. The Proof hat and Proof scarf can be paired for perfectly matched winter warmth.

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If your world needs a meditative still point, the soothing stockinette of Julie Hoover’s Rivage coat or the hypnotic shifting textures of Michele Wang’s Binary scarf may do the trick.

This collection is all about cozy comfort trimmed with distinctive details and innovative textures. We hope you’ll find something in the new lookbook to brighten the season for yourself and your loved ones. Happy knitting!

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One of Jared’s intentions in creating his Woolens collection was to introduce a variety of knitting techniques in approachable projects. The book is meant to be accessible to new knitters, but also to coax veterans of the craft into expanding their skill sets. For today’s blog we’d like to highlight four projects that just might teach you something new.

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Seeds Hats

This basic stockinette cap was conceived as a gentle introduction to stranded colorwork. Only six rounds (eight, if you work the largest size) require both colors at once, and those rounds sport a pattern that alternates colors every stitch so you’ll never need to worry about tensioning longer floats. The pattern is written for tubular cast on, a beautiful technique that’s well worth learning, but a simpler method can be substituted if you’re just starting out or if you’re short on time. Seeds is also a great canvas for playing with color combinations — Jared has written blog posts about color theory that may help you pick the perfect trio, but there’s no better way to learn about hue and value than to pull some leftovers from your stash and audition them in a quick “swatch cap.”

 

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Byway

Ready to try cables? This wrap is worked end to end in easily memorized patterning; the simple six-stitch cables are mirrored, so you can practice crossing with stitches held to the front and to the back, and the blocks of garter stitch flanking the cables will help you keep track of your work and recognize when it’s time for another cabling row. You may even decide you’re ready to try cabling without a cable needle before the end — stitches in woolen-spun Shelter won’t easily run down and escape while they’re momentarily free. As a bonus, Byway will teach you a nifty flat-lying selvedge you’ll want to apply to other projects.

 

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Halo

Lace knitting can seem intimidating or too fussy for knitters who enjoy the meditative rhythm of just motoring through a basic stitch pattern. We encourage you to test the waters with Halo, a pi shawl with rings of eyelets that are easy to work and to memorize. There’s plain knitting aplenty in the sea of stockinette that flows out from the center cast-on, and a gentle step toward more difficulty in the edging chart. If charts make your knees knock, never fear: this one is small, clear, and simple — and the legend is printed right beneath it.

 

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Crosshatch

Brioche stitch is all the rage for good reasons: it’s addictively rhythmic to knit, delightfully squishy, and full of airy warmth. Working in two colors reveals its architecture and prints the fabric with a graphic herringbone pattern — and the two yarns are worked alternately, so it’s less difficult than it looks. Crosshatch exaggerates the brioche texture by combining yarns of different weights as well as different colors. And the pattern lets you dial in a comfortable level of challenge by choosing between a simple garter selvedge and a more complex edging that perfectly matches the fabric.

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We hope you’ll enjoy adding to your knitter’s toolkit with these projects and others from Woolens! Please share your projects with #BTWoolens so we can savor your interpretations of these accessories. And let us know in the comments what you’ve enjoyed learning lately or what skills you’re hoping to acquire next!

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Announcing Woolens, Jared’s first printed book and single-designer collection since Made In Brooklyn seven years ago! Most knitters cut their teeth on simple accessories like scarves and hats. And for most of us there’s comfort and satisfaction in returning to such projects even after we’ve expanded our skills to become garment knitters. Maybe we need something finite to whip up for a friend’s birthday, or maybe we just want an uncomplicated palate cleanser after a strenuous cabled coat or a colorwork sweater. In homage to soothing, approachable knits, Jared decided to design a whole collection of accessories in his thoughtful, timeless style.

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The eleven cowls, scarves, wraps and hats in Woolens introduce a variety of techniques and invite exploration of various design options, prompting choices that personalize the garments. Created with masculine and feminine wardrobes in mind, these pieces meld classic good looks and engaging knitting. Many are simple enough for the adventurous beginner; if you’re ready to expand your skill set, try a hat designed as the gentlest possible introduction to stranded colorwork. When you’re ready for another level of challenge, knit a striking bi-color shawl that’s worked in the round and opened with a steek. With a clear and thorough reference section that’s a valuable resource in itself, Woolens will teach you all the new techniques you need to knit these beautiful accessories.

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Throughout this 138-page book, Jared’s gorgeous photographs reveal every detail of the designs as well as glimpses of his creative process and inspiration from the natural beauty of Japan. We hope you’ll soak up of plenty of inspiration for your next project — accessories make great gifts, after all — and enjoy the tactile experience of a BT collection on paper!

Woolens is available as a printed book or as a print + e-book combo and can be purchased right here on our website or from Brooklyn Tweed stockists around the world. As a special treat, the first 250 copies of the book sold online will be signed by the author. We hope you enjoy this inspiring new publication!

 


Quick Links:

Purchase a Print Book   |   Purchase a Print+E-Book Combo  |  View Individual Pattern Information

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Wool People 10 Cover

 

Welcome, Wool People! We’re thrilled to introduce a tenth collection of garments and accessories conceived by independent designers and curated by Brooklyn Tweed. This edition was the first opportunity for Wool People to make full use of our current stable of yarns, and we were particularly excited to see what the creative minds of the knitting world would imagine in Plains, our limited-edition laceweight Rambouillet.

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With half the collection being floaty lace accessories, it only seemed right to balance things out with the pleasing structure and heft of cables, so you’ll find chunky coats and mid-weight sweaters aplenty in this well-rounded collection. As the seasons are turning all around the globe, we love the thought of a knitter in New Zealand casting on a cozy cardi like Marylebone while another here in Portland is starting a lace crescent like Haro or Lunette to wear over tees and sundresses (or getting a jumpstart on a new cableknit wardrobe staple for next fall!).

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Our contributors are a wonderful mix of new and familiar faces from around the planet. One of our favorite aspects of Wool People is the open submission call that puts budding design talent on the same stage with established luminaries. Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting brief interviews with the designers whose work is appearing in Wool People for the first time, and we hope you’ll enjoy getting to know them.

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We also look forward to sharing some scenes from Saco River Dyehouse, one of our partners in producing Plains, to show you more about this yarn’s journey to your needles.

Enjoy the collection!

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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Last year the Brooklyn Tweed design team hatched the idea of setting a regular design challenge for ourselves — a chance for all five of us to throw down our best ideas interpreting a particular historical genre in knitwear. First up? Ganseys!

 

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These historical seaman’s sweaters of the British Isles were not only practical garments, worked densely to guard the wearer against the North Sea elements; they also featured ingenious construction to improve comfort and durability. Frequently embellished with bold textural motifs, they were canvases for knitters’ skill and artistry, and as a whole gave rise to a cottage industry that helped to support families.

Gansey Triptych

In seeking inspiration from this rich tradition, we sought to incorporate the elements that most fascinate us—striking stitch motifs, the sense of balance between patterned and plain fabric, the innovative adjustments to fit—while updating garment shapes and bending to modern knitterly realities. (Few of us nowadays want to knit adult-size sweaters in black wool at 8 stitches to the inch!)

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Today we launch five new sweater patterns in Loft and Shelter, plus a quick-knitting cap in Quarry. Each design riffs on different points of gansey styling; we look forward to highlighting some of those special details when we blog about our approach to this collection next week. BT Ganseys offer a variety of silhouettes, so whether you prefer a trim fit, a cozy oversize shape, or a dash of funky flare, we hope you’ll find a sweater that appeals.

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We also took the opportunity to restyle two hats from the BT archive to accompany this collection. We knit up Forge (shown above), a folded-brim watch cap marked by OXO cables and an elfin peak (shown above), in Fauna. Crag (shown in Artifact with the Vanora pullover), has been worked to a beanie length slightly shorter than the original, a modification that’s now been added to the pattern. (If you’ve previously purchased Crag electronically, you’ll receive a free update.)

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As always, we look forward to seeing how you’ll make these new designs your own! If you’re already a gansey connoisseur, maybe we’ll see you adding initials to the fabric of your sweater or deploying a Channel Island cast-on. If you’re new to the history of ganseys, we hope you’ll enjoy learning more about this rich knitting tradition. Happy knitting!

 

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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Nothing says fall knitting quite like cables. Many of us have spent the summer knitting airy shawls or linen pullovers, perhaps putting in a few rows on a woolly sleeve for that Rhinebeck sweater when the weather isn’t too oppressive. But once there’s a nip in the air, we can celebrate by diving straight into a pile of good wool and reveling in all the possibilities. This feels like the time of year to take on serious projects—big garments, new techniques, challenging designs that will make us better knitters. Cables offer up endless ways to produce visually appealing and extra-cozy garments, perfect for cold-weather wear and for satisfying our cravings for truly hearty knitting.

In that spirit, here’s a round-up of some of the cabled projects in our new Fall collection. We’re hoping a little extra information about each one might help you evaluate these options for your own autumn knitting. (Click on any of the images in the post to read full specs about each pattern.)

 

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Take a closer look if you… love textured, geometric fabrics and timeless style—and can’t get enough cables in your knitting.

Willamette’s stitches cross on every row to form a deeply textured, deeply cozy fabric. You’ll work from two different charts, one for each face of the scarf, and it’s more than a little addictive to watch two separate but harmonious patterns forming on each side. The cables are almost always two stitches crossing over one, so you’ll probably find you can ditch the cable needle and trust your stitches not to try any funny business while you slide them off and rearrange them. The motifs are easy to track and you may be able to abandon the charts completely after a few repetitions.

Things to know before you cast on: This isn’t a speedy knit, but it’s a handsome gift that may succeed with recipients who don’t normally wear handknits—and it’s definitely the kind of present you’ll want to steal back from time to time.

Skill Level: 3 out of 5 (intermediate)

 

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Take a closer look if you… long to work up some truly glorious chunky cables but tend to overheat in bulky sweaters. It will look stunning draped over your favorite armchair when you’re not wearing it.

This plush wrap is a cable-lover’s dream, and the large-scale motifs bring out Quarry’s very best. Every right-side row involves crossing stitches, but the motifs interact rhythmically and predictably, so you won’t have to peer at the charts every moment once you’ve established the pattern and can refer to the work you’ve already done. On wrong-side rows you’ll just knit or purl the stitches as they lie. The largest crossings are three over three, so depending on your comfort level and trust in your wool, you may be able to work largely without a cable needle. And you’ll learn a beautiful extension of I-cord that produces a flat vertical edge you may want to apply to future scarves, blankets, or cardigan fronts.

Things to know before you cast on: This pattern is worked from large charts.

Skill Level: 3 out of 5 (intermediate)

 

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Take a closer look if you… like dramatic texture but prefer tailored shapes.

McLoughlin looks complex but makes for a mellower knit than you might expect—large sections of the torso require cabling only every sixth row, and since it’s worked in the round with the motif only on the front, there’s quite a lot of knitting that won’t require your full attention. In chunky Quarry, this slightly cropped pullover will work up quickly despite the intricate patterning. And there’s no seaming apart from the underarm grafts.

Things to know before you cast on: There’s waist shaping to keep track of, and you’ll need to embrace the purl stitch to work in reverse stockinette. You’ll also have to be comfortable working from large charts.

Skill Level: 4 out of 5 (adventurous intermediate)

 

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Take a closer look if you… love the comfort and style of an extra-wide pullover but crave knitterly details to hold your interest while you’re making all that fabric.

If you enjoy knitting cables but don’t like the bulk large ones produce, consider fashion-forward Birch Bay. The traveling stitches that form the delicate leaf outlines are all single crosses, so you won’t ever need a cable needle. The simplicity of the garment’s shape makes this an intermediate-level knit, and there won’t be any fiddly modifications necessary to achieve the intended fit.

Things to know before you cast on: Birch Bay is meant to drape like a poncho, so don’t shy away from the generous ease the designer has indicated.

Skill Level: 3 out of 5 (intermediate)

And if none of these seems quite your style, here are a few more of our picks from the BT Archive that have become fan favorites:

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