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Keep up with our current projects, collections, ideas and announcements here

 

 

Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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The season of twinkly lights, eggnog, and snowball fights is the most wonderful time of the year — for woolens!  Some of us are trying to calculate how many hours of sleep we can exchange for crafting time to eke out a few more handmade gifts; others are blissfully escaping the chaos by casting on a long-term project that has nothing to do with the holidays and stresses of the wider world. If you’re in either of these camps, or simply dreaming of your next adventure in knitting, we have a surprise for you today: BT Winter 17, dropping early this year!

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Our house designers have decked the halls with twelve new garments and four accessories that use all four of Brooklyn Tweed’s core yarn lines. This collection includes our very first garment designs for Arbor, our worsted-spun DK Targhee wool. We’re so excited to show you what this new yarn can do on a larger canvas! Jared Flood’s masculine Svenson pullover, Norah Gaughan’s Shoji cocoon cardigan, and Véronik Avery’s Nila lap-front pullover were designed to make the most of Arbor’s vivid stitch definition and drape.

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If you need gift-knitting inspiration, Winter 17 offers up several unisex accessories. The Lancet hat can be worked in chunky Quarry for soft, tweedy, practically instant results or in Arbor for crisply defined chevrons and a full, nuanced palette. The Proof hat and Proof scarf can be paired for perfectly matched winter warmth.

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If your world needs a meditative still point, the soothing stockinette of Julie Hoover’s Rivage coat or the hypnotic shifting textures of Michele Wang’s Binary scarf may do the trick.

This collection is all about cozy comfort trimmed with distinctive details and innovative textures. We hope you’ll find something in the new lookbook to brighten the season for yourself and your loved ones. Happy knitting!

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We’ve loved following along with the Slow Fashion October movement this month and thought we’d join in the fun with a group photo featuring our Portland office team in their handknits.

Regardless of whether or not you participated in Slow Fashion October, we appreciate that there is a time set aside to have these conversations, which can be continued throughout the year. Read more about Slow Fashion October on the Fringe Association blog.

And in case you’re wondering what we’re wearing(!), patterns from left to right are: Stasis (Loft), Rift (Shelter), Manzanilla (Arbor), Sous Sous (Arbor), Little Wave (Shelter), Timberline (Shelter), Hayward (Loft), Freeport (Shelter doubled), Grettir (Shelter).

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Announcing Woolens, Jared’s first printed book and single-designer collection since Made In Brooklyn seven years ago! Most knitters cut their teeth on simple accessories like scarves and hats. And for most of us there’s comfort and satisfaction in returning to such projects even after we’ve expanded our skills to become garment knitters. Maybe we need something finite to whip up for a friend’s birthday, or maybe we just want an uncomplicated palate cleanser after a strenuous cabled coat or a colorwork sweater. In homage to soothing, approachable knits, Jared decided to design a whole collection of accessories in his thoughtful, timeless style.

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The eleven cowls, scarves, wraps and hats in Woolens introduce a variety of techniques and invite exploration of various design options, prompting choices that personalize the garments. Created with masculine and feminine wardrobes in mind, these pieces meld classic good looks and engaging knitting. Many are simple enough for the adventurous beginner; if you’re ready to expand your skill set, try a hat designed as the gentlest possible introduction to stranded colorwork. When you’re ready for another level of challenge, knit a striking bi-color shawl that’s worked in the round and opened with a steek. With a clear and thorough reference section that’s a valuable resource in itself, Woolens will teach you all the new techniques you need to knit these beautiful accessories.

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Throughout this 138-page book, Jared’s gorgeous photographs reveal every detail of the designs as well as glimpses of his creative process and inspiration from the natural beauty of Japan. We hope you’ll soak up of plenty of inspiration for your next project — accessories make great gifts, after all — and enjoy the tactile experience of a BT collection on paper!

Woolens is available as a printed book or as a print + e-book combo and can be purchased right here on our website or from Brooklyn Tweed stockists around the world. As a special treat, the first 250 copies of the book sold online will be signed by the author. We hope you enjoy this inspiring new publication!

 


Quick Links:

Purchase a Print Book   |   Purchase a Print+E-Book Combo  |  View Individual Pattern Information

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Today we’re excited to introduce three marled colorways to our worsted-weight Shelter line! Marls are created by combining plies of different colors together in a single strand of yarn; we paired a ply of white wool with a ply of neutral brown, black and grey to create Caribou, Newsprint and Narwhal. These beautiful yarns give finished fabrics a mottled texture and depth that brings classic sophistication to simple fabrics like stockinette, garter stitch  and ribbing.

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We’re welcoming the Shelter Marls with a brand new hat pattern for both men and women, designed by Jared Flood. Mawson includes directions for a standard beanie (shown right in Newsprint) or a slouchy version (shown left in Narwhal) which can also be worn with a doubled brim as a classic watchcap. For a limited time, receive the digital pattern free with a purchase of one or more skeins of your favorite Shelter Marl (1 skein is required for the beanie version, 2 skeins for the slouchy version). Through August 22, 2016 a coupon for the free pattern will ship with your order, redeemable at brooklyntweed.com.

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Mawson has been designed with a few thoughtful details to make the knitting enjoyable — a Ribbed Cable Cast On gives the appearance of a tubular edge without the fussiness of working a full Tubular Cast On. The crown shaping incorporates a special ribbed double decrease that is completely reversible, so that hat looks just as good with RS or WS out. The slouchy version can be worn as a classic watchcap by doubling the brim as shown above.

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We hope you enjoy these new additions to our yarn family — we can’t wait to see what beautiful projects you create!

 

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Wool People 10 Cover

 

Welcome, Wool People! We’re thrilled to introduce a tenth collection of garments and accessories conceived by independent designers and curated by Brooklyn Tweed. This edition was the first opportunity for Wool People to make full use of our current stable of yarns, and we were particularly excited to see what the creative minds of the knitting world would imagine in Plains, our limited-edition laceweight Rambouillet.

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With half the collection being floaty lace accessories, it only seemed right to balance things out with the pleasing structure and heft of cables, so you’ll find chunky coats and mid-weight sweaters aplenty in this well-rounded collection. As the seasons are turning all around the globe, we love the thought of a knitter in New Zealand casting on a cozy cardi like Marylebone while another here in Portland is starting a lace crescent like Haro or Lunette to wear over tees and sundresses (or getting a jumpstart on a new cableknit wardrobe staple for next fall!).

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Our contributors are a wonderful mix of new and familiar faces from around the planet. One of our favorite aspects of Wool People is the open submission call that puts budding design talent on the same stage with established luminaries. Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting brief interviews with the designers whose work is appearing in Wool People for the first time, and we hope you’ll enjoy getting to know them.

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We also look forward to sharing some scenes from Saco River Dyehouse, one of our partners in producing Plains, to show you more about this yarn’s journey to your needles.

Enjoy the collection!

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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Opener

 

Thank you all for your warm reception of our Ganseys collection last week. We’ve been so excited to launch our first batch of designs inspired by a specific knitting tradition, and today we’d like to share a little more about the gansey-style details our designers chose to incorporate in these garments.

When Jared proposed the gansey idea to our Design Team, he wasn’t necessarily looking for fully traditional construction. While BT’s aesthetic has deep roots into knitting history, we aim to create garments that feel totally contemporary. The goal, then, was to keep the characteristic features of historical ganseys in mind, but execute them playfully and in service of each designer’s own creative vision.

 

Fairweather

 

Véronik wanted to incorporate the triangular gusset shaping somehow, but not at the traditional place under the arms. Her choice to position gussets at the sides of the boat neckline creates a delightful visual detail that’s also completely functional, improving the fit of the garment and adding a bit of shoulder coverage that makes Fairweather easier to wear. She also wanted to knit in the traditional construction: a seamless body worked from the bottom up and divided at the armholes. She joined her shoulder seams with a visible 3-needle bind-off (which forms a tidy chain on the right side of the garment, another classic gansey detail) then picked up stitches for the sleeves around the armhole and worked circularly to the cuff. This directional shift in the knitting—upward on the body, downward on the sleeves—adds visual interest to the garment, as the lace and cable panels flow in opposing directions.

 

Larus

 

Norah also wanted to use the exposed 3-needle bind-off, but she chose to place hers at the back of the collar. Larus is perhaps the least traditional garment of the collection, but like the gansey it balances the proportions of patterned and plain fabric to beautiful effect. By putting the patterned section on the vertical instead of horizontally across the upper torso, Norah created a garment that’s more flattering to many body shapes without sacrificing roomy comfort. She also incorporated a unique knitterly detail by reversing the chevron cable motif along the wearer’s left neckline, as shown in the photo above left.

 

Vanora

 

Like Norah, Michele played with incorporating neckline shaping in an interesting way that maintains vertical patterns established in the lower portion of the body. She elaborated on a traditional flag motif of purl triangles on a stockinette ground to create parallelogram blocks that slant attractively to draw the eye across the fabric. She applied this subtle texture all over the body, punctuating it with delicate cables, but left her sleeves plain to let the eye rest. Vanora’s bracelet-length sleeves nod to the cropped sleeves on many historical feminine ganseys, which bared the wearers’ wrists and forearms for work.

 

Breslin

 

Both Julie and Jared opted for a more classic placement of textured stitches and cables on the upper yoke of the body. Despite the traditional positioning, each garment’s motifs are distinctly modern. Julie’s Breslin uses an original combination of purl stitches and cables to create an industrial effect. She chose to work the lower body and sleeves in reverse stockinette, dialing down the contrast between textured and plain fabric. Breslin’s tailored fit and set-in sleeves are non-traditional, but honor the gansey’s origins as good-looking workwear for those of us who aren’t employed in the fisheries.

 

Caspian

 

Jared liked the idea of using oversized chains, which seemed appropriate for a nautical garment. Caspian nods to several other historical gansey features as well. The ribbed saddle shoulders that extend vertically from the sleeve cap were meant to mimic the knit-and-purl welts that often adorn gansey shoulders. Another detail he incorporated from traditional ganseys is the seamless flow of the side seam details through the underarm gusset and down the sleeve. Since he wasn’t working gussets, he created a variation on that theme by working a side seam detail on the body that flows into the armhole selvedge of the yoke. He also cribbed a common split hem detail from the traditional gansey, beginning the seam at the stockinette portion of the torso to leave a small vent at each side.

The marriage of beauty and purpose that distinguishes gansey knitting is endlessly inspiring to all of us here. We hope you’ll enjoy exploring BT’s unique take on the gansey tradition, savoring these details as much as we have.

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Last year the Brooklyn Tweed design team hatched the idea of setting a regular design challenge for ourselves — a chance for all five of us to throw down our best ideas interpreting a particular historical genre in knitwear. First up? Ganseys!

 

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These historical seaman’s sweaters of the British Isles were not only practical garments, worked densely to guard the wearer against the North Sea elements; they also featured ingenious construction to improve comfort and durability. Frequently embellished with bold textural motifs, they were canvases for knitters’ skill and artistry, and as a whole gave rise to a cottage industry that helped to support families.

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In seeking inspiration from this rich tradition, we sought to incorporate the elements that most fascinate us—striking stitch motifs, the sense of balance between patterned and plain fabric, the innovative adjustments to fit—while updating garment shapes and bending to modern knitterly realities. (Few of us nowadays want to knit adult-size sweaters in black wool at 8 stitches to the inch!)

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Today we launch five new sweater patterns in Loft and Shelter, plus a quick-knitting cap in Quarry. Each design riffs on different points of gansey styling; we look forward to highlighting some of those special details when we blog about our approach to this collection next week. BT Ganseys offer a variety of silhouettes, so whether you prefer a trim fit, a cozy oversize shape, or a dash of funky flare, we hope you’ll find a sweater that appeals.

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We also took the opportunity to restyle two hats from the BT archive to accompany this collection. We knit up Forge (shown above), a folded-brim watch cap marked by OXO cables and an elfin peak (shown above), in Fauna. Crag (shown in Artifact with the Vanora pullover), has been worked to a beanie length slightly shorter than the original, a modification that’s now been added to the pattern. (If you’ve previously purchased Crag electronically, you’ll receive a free update.)

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As always, we look forward to seeing how you’ll make these new designs your own! If you’re already a gansey connoisseur, maybe we’ll see you adding initials to the fabric of your sweater or deploying a Channel Island cast-on. If you’re new to the history of ganseys, we hope you’ll enjoy learning more about this rich knitting tradition. Happy knitting!

 

 


Quick Links:

View all the patterns   |   View the Lookbook  |  View Collection on Ravelry

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This week we’re looking back on some of BT’s greatest garments of the year, polling our staff on their most-loved designs. Narrowing down our favorite sweaters to a Top 5 was incredibly difficult. From instant classics like Michele Wang’s Cordova (Winter ’15) to the big drama of Jared Flood’s Carpeaux (Winter ’15) to sharp modern shapes like Melissa Wehrle’s Truss (Wool People 9), there were so many more great designs we wanted to include. But the votes were finally tallied and five intriguingly different garments emerged.

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Few knitters can resist a classic gansey, and Jared’s feminine version was just what many of us had been looking for. Alvy’s set-in sleeves and waist shaping keep the silhouette trim, while the graphic coin cables on a ground of double moss stitch and welt details at the hems, cuffs, and shoulders add nautical flair.

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A bomber jacket worked in soft, doughy brioche stitch? Yes, please! We fell hard for Shield’s handsome distinctive charm. The swirling faux cables and pockets are perfect details for menswear, subtle but intriguing. Brioche fabrics get their cozy double thickness from some knitting maneuvers that may be unfamiliar, but we find the rhythm quickly becomes natural.

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Marshal was one of Norah’s first designs for BT, and we adored her stylish, edgy take on the military cardigan. This piece is all about shifts in texture: the brioche accents are worked in Shelter for extra heft against a light, tailored body in Loft. The effect is tough, smart, and totally wearable.

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We’re so glad we pushed Julie to design a stranded colorwork sweater! Filtering Fair Isle through her minimalist aesthetic produced a refined pullover with graphic peerie bands. The simple palette of Fossil, Hayloft, and Truffle Hunt is unexpected and so effective, bringing out the heathered depth of the colors. We love Ashland as an introduction to steeks, which allow us to knit both the body and the set-in sleeves in the round.

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It’s not hard to see why Rift garnered the most votes in our poll. We can’t tear our eyes from those gorgeous ribbed epaulets, which give the appearance of raglan shaping to sleeves that are actually set in. This staple sweater gets everything right, and the big charts for the shoulders give us something to chew on during the knitting as well as creating a fetching masculine detail.

We want to thank all of you for your adventurousness in embracing such a wide variety of designs, allowing us to flex our creative muscles and to push ourselves to work outside our own comfort zones! Don’t forget to chime in with your own 2015 favorites in the comments or on social media by using #BTfaves15. We love hearing your opinions and spreading the love to all the hardworking designers who contributed to Brooklyn Tweed this year!

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What a year it’s been for Brooklyn Tweed! A cross-country move, new team members, a new yarn, new print books… As we settle in with plenty of wool and tea to weather a week of chilly rain, it seems like the perfect time to look back on some of our favorite things from 2015. We asked the BT staff to vote on their favorite accessories from BT Winter 15, Wool People 9, BT Men 2, BT Fall 15, and of course Olga’s new Capsule Collection, and we’ve been counting down our staff picks on social media all week. From cabled hats to delicate lace pi shawls, our designers produced a lot to love!

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Jared’s densely cabled hat from BT Men 2 won our hearts with its timeless, unisex style. All those cables make it fun to knit and warm to wear, and Crag has such broad appeal that it’s a perfect gift knit for either men or women. Some knitters have been going down a needle size to achieve a snug beanie style with a shorter crown; if your recipient prefers this look you may want to try this modification.

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Olga made such fine use of the interlocking Swiss crosses motif in this cowl for her CAPSULE Collection—the effect is bold, graphic, and modern. We love imagining color combinations (have you played with our new color comparison feature yet?) and think Jujika would also be an excellent way to use up our Loft leftovers, shifting through multiple contrast colors. Wear this doubled and you’ve got a whopping eight layers of Loft wrapped around your neck, which sounds just about right for enjoying the outdoors this winter.

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Easy to knit and versatile to wear, Harper’s unusual fabric of twisted rib worked over gauge makes us want to knit more than one. The single-row stripes create an interplay of colors that’s intriguing in closely related shades or eye-catching in high contrast. Either way, we love this design from BT Winter 15 as the perfect light beanie or easy-going slouch to throw on for a bit of extra warmth or fashion.

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We love the classic elegance of Andrea’s pi shawl from Wool People 9, which would also make a beautiful accent as a throw in the living room or a special gift for a new baby. The concentric shifts in pattern keep the knitting interesting, and the finished piece is a true heirloom. The lace motifs are deceptively simple with easily repeatable stitch patterns, and the finished results look masterful. We also love the idea of sinking into a meditative project like Arbre as an antidote to the frenzy of the holidays.

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Our top vote-getter was Jared’s clever cap from BT Fall 15. Lolo is quick enough to knit up for last-minute gifting, but doesn’t skimp on engaging details. We love the aviator-inspired shape and the pure fun of knitting short-row garter segments sideways to form a cap. And there are so many options for personalizing this design: our own Jen knit one in stripes of Embers and Wool Socks, while Sarah is dreaming of a marled version in two colors of Loft… We love seeing all the Lolos cropping up on Instagram and Ravelry!

Please do play along — it wasn’t easy for any of us to pick just five, and we’d love to see your own favorites from the past year tagged #BTfaves15!

Next week we feature the second half of our “Top 10” for the year: Garments! Stay tuned on Instagram throughout the week and here on the blog for another wrap up next weekend.

 

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