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Welcome back knitters! For those of you who have been knitting Pascal cardigans along with us, you should now be done knitting the body of your cardigan. If you are still working on your sweater, don’t fret! We’ll be here for you when you’re ready.

Before we secure and cut the steek, we’ll be grafting together our underarm stitches using a tapestry needle and the Kitchener Stitch.

The Kitchener Stitch is used to sew live stitches together in a way that mimics a row of knitting. Pieces to be joined are live on needles, with right sides facing out and both needle tips pointing to the right. Use a length of yarn approximately four times the length of the finished seam, attached to the right edge of the fabric on the Back Needle (use the yarn the piece was knitted with, or attach a new length of yarn), and follow the directions in your pattern to work the steps.

TipIf you’re grafting stitches with Quarry or another lightly-spun yarn, twist your working yarn a few times in the direction in which it’s plied (counterclockwise, in the case of Quarry) to add a bit of extra tensile strength to the yarn before you thread your tapestry needle and start seaming.

Once the underarms are grafted, our sweaters are now ready to become cardigans! If this is your first time steeking, we recommend reading through the Special Techniques section of your pattern and our Foundations: Steeking post before proceeding, both of which explain in detail how to complete the following steps.

First, locate your 5 steek stitches and mark the center stitch by sewing a row of basting stitches through the center column of the stitch. The basting stitches will act as a guide to make sure you stay on course as you secure your stitches in the next step.

Before you begin cutting, you must secure your stitches; this is what prevents your knitting from unraveling.

To secure your steek with a crochet hook:
Start on the left lower side of your steek and crochet from bottom to top, working through the left side of the first stitch to the left of center and the right leg of the next stitch to the left, followed by a slip stitch.  Repeat all the way up and fasten off your yarn.

Rejoin your yarn on the right upper side of the steek and work from top to bottom, working through the right leg of the first stitch to the right of center and the left leg of the next stitch to the right, followed by a slip stitch. Repeat all the way down and fasten off your yarn.

Tip: Crochet with a non-superwash wool yarn (Shelter leftovers work great!) so that it sticks securely to your steek stitches!

To secure your steek by hand sewing or with a machine:
Sew two lines of closely spaced stitches to each side of the center stitch from neckline to hem (or hem to neckline).

If using a sewing machine, be careful that you don’t catch your colorwork floats in the feed dogs or on the presser foot. Work slowly and place a sheet of tissue or tracing paper under your fabric to stitch through — you can tear it away once you’ve finished sewing.

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Once your steek is secure, simply cut through the center column of stitches from hem to neckline to create the front opening of your cardigan. 

Congratulations! Now that you’ve cut your steek, the hardest part is over! Next week we’ll finish up our cardigans by picking up and knitting the band stitches, and tack down the steek stitches.

We hope you’ll share your progress this week in the comments below or in the KAL forum on Ravelry!

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Welcome back knitters, this week we’ll be talking all about the steps needed to join your Pascal sleeves to your sweater body and then begin working through the yoke – the final steps before steeking!

At this point you will have three knitted tubes to work with: two sleeve tubes, a right and a left, on waste yarn or stitch holders and a sweater body tube still live on your needles. To join these three pieces together first locate the “Union Round” section of your pattern, for the digital version of Pascal that will be page 10.

TIP: Lay your three knitted tubes out in front of you to make sure that you’re starting with the right sleeve and not the left – since you’re beginning your round on the front of your sweater, your right sleeve will be the first sleeve that you knit to.

After orienting yourself and your knitted tubes, pick up the sweater body and knit across the right front, your pattern will tell you exactly where to stop before you reach your stitch marker.

To form the right underarm, transfer the indicated number of body stitches to waste yarn or a stitch holder and remove the side marker – these live stitches will be grafted together later with live stitches from your right sleeve as a part of the finishing process. Next, place a new marker to indicate where your raglan shaping will be worked.

Now to join your first sleeve! Place your right sleeve stitches on a spare set of needles and remove the waste yarn or stitch holder that was keeping them in place, a short circular needle or set of DPNs work great for this task. Be sure to keep the separately held live stitches, those that will form the underarm, still on waste yarn or on a stitch holder to be grafted later.

To join these right sleeve stitches to your sweater body, simply knit across them taking care to maintain even tension on the strand of yarn that will now be connecting the sleeve and body together. Once you have worked across your sleeve stitches, place another raglan marker and knit across the back of your sweater body until the point in which your pattern instructs you to stop.

The left sleeve will be worked the same as the right sleeve; first you will transfer underarm stitches to waste yarn or a stitch holder, place a raglan marker, knit across the left sleeve stitches, place another raglan marker, and knit across the left front body stitches to complete the round.

And just like that, you’ve successfully joined your sleeves!

From the sleeve joining round to the final neck bind-off you will continue to work your sleeves and body stitches all on the same longer circular needle. This can feel like slow going at first since you’ll be working over more stitches now than you had before when working three smaller tubes, but rest assured that once you begin your raglan shaping things will begin to speed up again.

For Pascal, both single and double decreases are used for shaping the raglans: Knit 2 Together (K2tog) paired with a modified Slip Slip Knit (SSK), and Knit 3 Together (K3tog) paired with a modified Slip Slip Slip Knit (SSSK). You may be asking yourself, why use two different kinds of decreases? Well, K2tog and K3tog decreases lean to the right / while SSK and SSSK decreases lean to the left \ . In the illustration above, you can see that the right raglan shaping and left neckline both lean to the right, while the left raglan shaping and right neckline both lean to the left. We’ll use decreases that lean the same way to visually complement the slope of each section.

DID YOU KNOW: A raglan sleeve extends in one piece from the underarm to the collar, creating a diagonal seam. It is named after FitzRoy James Henry Somerset, 1st Baron Raglan, who after the loss of his right arm in the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 wore this style of sleeve to allow extra range of motion for his remaining arm. In later knitting-related history, Baron Raglan was responsible for ordering James Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan (for whom the sweater was named) to lead the infamous Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava (for which the headwear was named) in 1854.

Join us next week when we’ll dive into the world of steeking, and be another step closer to a wonderful wearable heirloom. Share your progress this week in the comments below or in the KAL forum on Ravelry!

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Let’s Knit Along!

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We’re so excited to finally start our Pascal Cardigans with you for our Winter of Colorwork KAL — are you?! Let’s get to it…

Cast On & Sleeves

This week we’re starting with the sleeves. They’re knit in the round, starting with a garter stitch band, so the Long Tail Cast On is a great choice to create a tidy edge.

But first — have you swatched in garter stitch, stockinette, and colorwork to determine the needle sizes you’ll need?

14 stitches & 22 rounds = 4″ in stockinette stitch with Size A needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 6 mm (US 10)
14 stitches & 20 rounds = 4″ in colorwork chart patterns with Size B needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 6.5 mm (US 10½)
14 stitches & 32 rows = 4″ in garter stitch with Size C needle(s), after blocking | Suggested Size: 5.5 mm (US 9)

(Your colorwork fabric should be swatched, wet-blocked, and measured when dry to determine whether Size B should be larger, smaller, or equal to Size A. We recommend Speed-Swatching for Circular Knitting, described in the Special Techniques section of your Pascal pattern and in our Swatching 101 article.)

Check your pattern schematic before casting on to see if you’ll need to lengthen or shorten your sleeves. Remember to take yoke depth into account – the deeper the yoke, the farther down your body the armholes reach, so the wrist-to-armhole length of your sleeves will be shorter. (Pascal’s yoke and armholes are a few inches deeper than you’d find on a slim fitted pullover, for example.)

Tip: You’ll need to make any length adjustments before reaching the colorwork section of your sleeves, so that the colorwork will line up on the sleeves and body of your sweater. Don’t worry – if you finish your sweater and discover your sleeve length isn’t quite right, it’s easy to fix!

Cast on your sleeve with your Size C needle for the garter stitch cuff, switch to your Size A needle to knit the main portion of your sleeve in stockinette, then switch again to your Size B needle for the colorwork section.

Colorwork Tips

Before starting your colorwork section, read about color dominance and maintaining even float tension in our Stranded Colorwork 101 article.

The column to the side of each of the colorwork charts in Pascal illustrates which colors should be held in which position so that the colorwork motif will stand out from the background.

The dominant color should always be stranded below the background color. If you hold one color in each hand, the easiest way to manage color dominance is to hold the dominant color in your left hand and bring it from it below the background color (held in your right hand) on the WS of the fabric. If you hold both colors in the same hand, be sure that your dominant color yarn is always coming from below your background color yarn.

In the example above, the light colored motif will stand out against the dark colored background. If you have a dark motif on a light background, be extra careful to maintain color dominance so that your dark color doesn’t visually recede. Following the color dominance guide in your pattern will ensure that your colorwork pops!

Note that there is a separate colorwork chart for each Pascal sleeve – mark each sleeve as you finish it so you can tell the left sleeve from the right.

Once each sleeve is complete, transfer your stitches to a holder or to waste yarn – then you’re ready to knit the body!

Happy knitting!

How to Knit Along

For our Winter of Colorwork KAL, we’ll be knitting the Pascal cardigan from our Winter 19 collection – but you can choose any pattern you like! We’ll share our tips and techniques for working each part of the cardigan — choosing colors, swatching for stranded colorwork, sweater construction, and steeking, to name a few.

Choose your favorite yarn and knitting project that features stranded colorwork. (The project should be knit using Brooklyn Tweed yarn, worked from a Brooklyn Tweed pattern, or both.) If you already have a WIP, feel free to join the KAL to finish your project or ask us questions if you’re stuck.

• Check with your local yarn store to see if they have classes or meet ups scheduled for the KAL.
• Follow the Winter of Colorwork KAL thread in the Brooklyn Tweed Fan Club forum on Ravelry.
• Read our weekly blog posts for each week’s tips and techniques — no matter your knitting pace!

Next week: Part 4 — Begin the Body!

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We wrote plenty of resources last year leading up to our Winter of Colorwork KAL, so we’ll use this time before and during the KAL as opportunities to share our tips and techniques for working each part of your colorwork project — choosing colors, swatching for stranded colorwork, and sweater construction (if you’re working on a sweater), to name just a few.

Members of the Brooklyn Tweed Team are also knitting along with Gudrun Johnston’s Pascal Cardigan in Quarry (to be released next week with our Winter 19 collection), so our posts each week will be focused on working the parts of this project in particular. However, many of our tips, tricks, and suggested resources can still apply to whatever project you may be knitting — so feel free to participate with any pattern of your choice. (Tip: If you choose a project that involves steeking, such as the Pascal Cardigan, you can participate in Fringe Association’s Steekalong, as well!)

This week, we’re covering choosing colors for stranded colorwork knitting, the best part after choosing your pattern. It’s a wonderful opportunity to play — you can produce such a wide range of visual results from a single colorwork chart, depending on how you interact with your colors and especially when you have an eye toward the concepts of hue and value. We wrote a crash course on a few fundamental rules about color theory for stranded colorwork and how you can use this knowledge as a springboard in crafting your color palettes — click below to (re)read!

We knit our Pascal samples in the following colorways, and as you can see, you can produce such a wide range of color stories — whether bold or muted, dark or light.

And if you’re in need of more inspiration — Christina of the BT Team is knitting her Pascal in Slate (MC), Sandstone (C1), and Lazulite (C2). We used her swatches for our Steeking article — the motifs look quite a bit like a flock of sheep in this color combination!

Jamie, on the other hand, is knitting her Pascal in Sandstone (MC), Flint (C1), and Garnet (C2). The bright and rich red of Garnet pops beautifully against Sandstone and Flint’s neutral brown tones.

So, now that you’re armed with some color theory and (hopefully) plenty of inspiration — go forth and plan! If you’re knitting Pascal, don’t forget to download our Pascal Coloring Sheet to get your creative juices flowing. This is a great tool to test color placement before starting a swatch. As a supplement or alternative, you can also use the Compare Colors feature on all our yarn pages.

Christina is particularly keen on helping people choose colors for their knitting, so if you have any questions or would like a recommendation for any colorwork project, leave a comment below with the pattern name and color family you prefer, and she’ll be happy to help. (Tip: It’ll make her day!)

All right friends, it’s time to hone your colorwork knitting skills! Next week we’ll be talking about selecting a sweater size and swatching for colorwork, but until then you can read more about the Winter of Colorwork KAL and join the conversation in our Ravelry pre-chatter thread.

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We’re celebrating independence and collaboration with the release of Wool People 11 today! We always enjoy the chance our Wool People project offers to work alongside independent designers, both new and established — there’s a sense of fresh energy and perspective in combing through the hundreds of submissions we receive for these collections and in bringing the selected designs to life.

This issue feels extra special because it incorporates our two newest yarns, Arbor and Vale. Next week we’ll do a feature on the Vale accessories and share the designers’ thoughts about working with our new laceweight. But before we delve into the wonderful world of lace and kick off our Summer of Lace KAL, we want to talk about the Wool People 11 garments. There are eight gorgeous sweaters in three different yarns, and what really stands out to us is the diversity of fabrics the designers have achieved in these wearable, flattering pieces.

For cozy bundling in the light but warm stockinette that Shelter creates, Ann Klimpert and Andrea Mowry present Rivet and Ronan. Both of these long-length cardigans rely on Shelter’s airy, woolen-spun nature to stay versatile and hold their shape despite their large swathes of fabric. Rivet has a vintage feel, while Ronan’s is a totally modern silhouette with a collar in fluffy brioche.

For those who like a trim and classic pullover, Mossbank and Bell give a twist to timeless layering pieces by using mostly reverse stockinette fabric. The pebbly texture of the purl side is a great way to set off softly rounded cables in a woolen-spun yarn, as Ann McCauley chose to do with Bell. Kerry Robb was inspired by the back side of her swatch in our Newsprint marl, realizing that the bumps blend the contrasting colors into an inviting heathery haze.

Loft in garter stitch is total comfort fabric, and triangular shawls like Nancy Whitman’s Level are comfort wear. For cool summer evenings when you want to linger outdoors, this graphic layer is the remedy. Level’s inventive construction and a dab of intarsia make the knitting sprightlier than usual for a garter triangle. If you’ve got a summer road trip planned, we think light and packable Loft shawls make good travel companions as knitting projects and as finished pieces.

One reason we’ve been so excited to add Arbor to our core yarn line is that it’s entirely different from our woolen-spun yarns. Besides being stronger, denser, and smoother, Arbor is rounder. Its third ply makes the yarn cylindrical rather than helical, and its tighter twist keeps those three plies completely engaged in a happy ménage. Arbor’s stitches don’t blend in amongst their neighbors; they stand proud and individual. And that means we can knit fabrics with more dimension and more vivid texture.

Four of our Wool People designers put Arbor through its paces with very different approaches. Melissa Wehrle uses a simple all-over texture of knits and purls to create a waffly fabric for Harlowe, and a relaxed gauge allows the sweater to drape beautifully. Yoko Hatta’s sculptural Akiko cardigan shows the yarn’s affinity for cables and contrasts moss stitch fronts with a clean plane of fluid stockinette on the back. Olga Buraya-Kefelian opts for a modern, high-impact ribbing treatment to elevate her Boundary mock turtleneck. And Emily Greene pulls out all the stops with panels of directional half-twisted rib in her Divide pullover.

Are you ready to swatch some new fabrics to add to your closet? We hope you find inspiration in the talent and vision of the Wool People designers. Take some time with the new lookbook and let us know what’s calling your name!

 

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Our latest collection, BT Yokes, offers even the most seasoned colorwork knitter lots of opportunity for experimentation. We had fun playing with color options for Schulz, a unisex pullover designed by Michele Wang. Try Cinnabar or Thistle for a bright pop of vintage nostalgia, or a neutral like Cast Iron or Pumpernickel for a slightly more subdued effect. These are just a few ideas — we can’t wait to see what you come up with!

The colorways as shown in the photo above:

1 — Almanac (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

2 — Tent (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

3 — Thistle (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

4 — Cast Iron (C1 & C3), Fossil (C2)

5 — Pumpernickel (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

6 — Embers (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

7 — Hayloft (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

8 — Cinnabar (C1), Fossil (C2) & Cast Iron (C3)

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Sunbursts, trees and stars, reindeer and snowflakes, mutable landscapes of blended color. In vivid hues or in natural sheep shades, figural or geometric in design, the yoke sweaters of the North Atlantic are distinctive and enduring. The story of their creation in the 20th century is one of enterprise and canny marketing as knitters leveraged traditional skills to make ends meet in a rapidly changing and newly global economy.

The Icelandic lopapeysa, the Scandinavian and Shetland yokes, and the sweaters of the Bohus Stickning cooperative in Sweden may all have their roots in a Greenlandic ornamental accessory called the nuilarmiut that has nothing to do with knitting — it’s an element of traditional formalwear made of glass beads that cover the shoulders and bust in a large collar of brightly patterned geometric designs. The nuilarmiut’s appearance in a 1930 Danish film and, later, on members of the Danish royal family seems to have inspired several Scandinavian knitwear designers to imitate the effect in wool. Three of the earliest known circular yoke patterns bore the name “Eskimo,” suggesting their common inspiration. In the 1940s, the Bohus Stickning company in Sweden made the yoke sweater a mid-century status symbol. The designers’ innovative and masterful color play broke entirely with traditional motifs and methods to create subtly shifting forms and juxtaposed hues, all rendered at extremely fine gauge in luxurious angora-blend yarns. Bohus sweaters were worn by royalty and cultural icons — and commanded prices to match. The knitters’ earnings supported many families during an economically difficult time. Cottage industries in Shetland and Iceland were also quick to capitalize on the international taste for yokes, channeling their potent knitting histories to create garments that became lucrative exports more accessible to the average pocket book.

The strategic position of the patterning on a circular yoke serves two purposes. The designs ring the throat and shoulders like jewelry, drawing attention to the face. The plain body and sleeves heighten this effect while slyly achieving a second end: all that unadorned fabric is easy and relatively speedy knitting. In the case of the famous Shetland yokes, many of which featured tree and star designs borrowed from neighboring Norway, the jumper bodies and sleeves were knit by machine and then passed to the handknitters for the colorwork portion. The sweaters could then be completed at a cracking pace to achieve a successful commercial scale, and the knitters could develop one beautiful variation after another by skillfully shading both the background and foreground colors. The Bohus sweaters were always knit entirely by hand, but even at 8 or 9 stitches to the inch, the plain bodies allowed the most accomplished knitters to complete a couture garment in just a few weeks. Icelandic production knitters still work by hand, but take advantage of their native sheep’s long-stapled fleeces to work at a loose large gauge that supports strong geometric motifs and rapid sweater completion.

Yokes have climbed to the height of fashion, plunged into outmoded fustiness, and ascended once again in recent decades. Across the North Atlantic, a resurgence of admiration for these powerful symbols of national identity has led younger generations to embrace them. Knitters around the world have been quick to appreciate the joy of crafting yokes; a basic circular yoke is one of the most foolproof sweaters to knit, and the possibilities for elaboration are endless.

Brooklyn Tweed pays homage to the bold beauty and variety of yoke designs in five sweaters and two accessories that tip the cap to history, but hew to modern fit principles and allow each designer to explore original ideas. In these pages you’ll find seamless construction (both bottom up and top down), stranded colorwork, cabled texture, and even a wink at classic cartoons. Welcome to BT Yokes.

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Winter is lingering long in Portland this year, but we’re choosing to see these days of near-freezing drizzle as a prompt to make the most of our knitwear. Warm weather still feels so far away that we’re more than happy to contemplate casting on another sweater, especially with the lure of a just-right portion of decorative stitchwork. That’s what we love about yoke designs: their perfect balance of carefree stockinette seasoned with a dash of colorwork or textural patterning. They’re fun to knit, easy to integrate into any wardrobe, and endlessly inviting when we want to experiment with color or cables. To share our enthusiasm, we’re releasing our themed collection for 2017 today: BT Yokes.

We drew inspiration from the sweaters of Iceland, Shetland, and Scandinavia — a history we enjoyed researching for a feature in our lookbook. Jared Flood’s Atlas (now sized for the whole family) nods to the lopapeysa; Véronik Avery elevates her Frostpeak colorwork with cunningly placed purl stitches, an idea pioneered by the Bohus Stickning designers of Sweden; Michele Wang’s Morse cowl stacks bands of small geometric motifs common to Shetland and Norway.

The beauty of yokes has always been their versatility as a canvas for anything a designer can dream up, so we haven’t been too faithful in our interpretations of the form. Some garments apply inventive shaping principles (wait till you see Julie Hoover’s newest take on raglan decreases) and motifs that owe more to Charlie Brown than to anything ever knit in the North Atlantic regions. Norah Gaughan’s flights of cabled fancy are iconic in and of themselves, and her full powers are on display in Tundra and Pyry.

A surprise storm system meant we had to be creative about staging our photoshoot for BT Yokes, but is there a more perfect backdrop for a collection of cozy woolens than a fresh blanket of snow? We hope you’ll enjoy browsing the new lookbook and making the most of the knitting weather.

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Greetings from wintry Portland! As we get ready to leaf over to 2017, we’ve enjoyed looking back on our work from the past year and remembering our favorite BT knitwear. All of our office staff have weighed in with their picks of 2016, and a Top Ten have emerged.

 

The striking poncho shape of the women’s version captured our hearts in particular — not to mention those luscious cables.

Originally knit in Quarry as part of our Ganseys collection, this hat got a whole new look when we released our worsted-spun DK Arbor last fall. Those cables really pop in a yarn built for stitch definition.

Melissa Wehrle knocked it out of the park with her modern interpretation of the Aran pullover in Wool People 10. We love the traditional cables updated with the vented hem and slim sleeves.

We all agree: classic cabled shawl-collar cardigans forever. Especially when they’re warm but light in quick-knitting Quarry.

Oh, those elegant lines! This beautiful cardigan is flattering on everyone.

This quick and satisfying knit uses Arbor to render the Tree of Life — one of our favorite traditional motifs — in stunning high definition. If you can part with it, this cowl makes a great gift.

We love the tailored fit and the bold, simple patterning against a background of reverse stockinette.

This layering piece is perfect for three-season wear, and the shawl collar really sets it apart.

The intriguing fabric of this scarf is such a delightful opportunity to play with color and yarn weight combinations.

 

Maximum coziness, beautiful cables. We love the oversized fit cleverly adapted to eliminate bulk under the arms.

What were your favorite Brooklyn Tweed patterns this year? Let us know in the comments!

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The season of twinkly lights, eggnog, and snowball fights is the most wonderful time of the year — for woolens!  Some of us are trying to calculate how many hours of sleep we can exchange for crafting time to eke out a few more handmade gifts; others are blissfully escaping the chaos by casting on a long-term project that has nothing to do with the holidays and stresses of the wider world. If you’re in either of these camps, or simply dreaming of your next adventure in knitting, we have a surprise for you today: BT Winter 17, dropping early this year!

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Our house designers have decked the halls with twelve new garments and four accessories that use all four of Brooklyn Tweed’s core yarn lines. This collection includes our very first garment designs for Arbor, our worsted-spun DK Targhee wool. We’re so excited to show you what this new yarn can do on a larger canvas! Jared Flood’s masculine Svenson pullover, Norah Gaughan’s Shoji cocoon cardigan, and Véronik Avery’s Nila lap-front pullover were designed to make the most of Arbor’s vivid stitch definition and drape.

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If you need gift-knitting inspiration, Winter 17 offers up several unisex accessories. The Lancet hat can be worked in chunky Quarry for soft, tweedy, practically instant results or in Arbor for crisply defined chevrons and a full, nuanced palette. The Proof hat and Proof scarf can be paired for perfectly matched winter warmth.

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If your world needs a meditative still point, the soothing stockinette of Julie Hoover’s Rivage coat or the hypnotic shifting textures of Michele Wang’s Binary scarf may do the trick.

This collection is all about cozy comfort trimmed with distinctive details and innovative textures. We hope you’ll find something in the new lookbook to brighten the season for yourself and your loved ones. Happy knitting!

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