JF's Notebook
Photo of Jared Flood

Notebook

Penned by Jared Flood

Hello and welcome! I'm a knitter, photographer, designer and the creative director at Brooklyn Tweed. I use this notebook as a space to record inspiration and write about my creative work both inside and outside of BT. Thanks for reading, and don't be a stranger—I love hearing from you!

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BOOK_LAUNCH

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I’m excited to announce today’s release of a new book of my work that we’ve published here at Brooklyn Tweed! Woolens is a project that I’ve been knocking around in my head for quite a while, but it wasn’t until I visited Japan last year that I was inspired to get the project off the ground. Looking back now, I can definitely see the influence of that trip in both the projects and the imagery inside these pages!

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NTBK_woolens_launch_01

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The book is dedicated to the humble knitted accessory – small, portable projects that are meditative to knit and accessible to adventurous beginners. Inside you’ll find a mix of all of my favorite knitting traditions: colorwork, cables, lace, and textured stitches.

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NTBK_woolens_launch_02

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We’ve put together a book preview (see below) if you’d like a sneak peek at what you’ll find inside — and if you’d like to check out each individual project more in depth, you can find them all here. The book is available in print, as well as a print + e-book combo, and I’ve signed the first 250 copies that will be shipping from our Portland HQ today!

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 I look forward to seeing what unique creations you’ll make with these designs, and I hope you like the book!

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My very talented cousin, Craig Flood, is a videographer in Portland, Oregon. Back in November, he was visiting NYC and staying with me as a houseguest during photoshoot week for our Winter collection (coming tomorrow—so excited!). When I began telling him about the concept for the art history-inspired shoot I was working on for the collection, he thought it sounded like the perfect subject for a video story—and so we decided to do a cousin collaboration!

Craig tagged along with me on the days leading up to the shoot and captured a nice look at the process involved in weaving it all together.

I’ve had the idea of doing a collection of designs inspired by art historical references for years. I loved the idea of bringing my post-academia love of art history together with our work at Brooklyn Tweed in some way. In college I spent 9 months abroad in Rome studying art history and fell in love with the lighting and composition of paintings from the Baroque period, especially those of the Dutch Masters like Vermeer and Rembrandt. I thought it would be a fun creative challenge to create imagery inspired by this genre of painting for a knitwear collection, and to use art historical references as a springboard for our designers to begin concepts for their garments. Last November, when our Design Team convened in NYC for our regular design retreat, we took a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to gather inspiration for some of our newest patterns in the Winter 15 collection.

Craig’s video is a nice glimpse into our process for putting a shoot together; I hope you enjoy it! (I’m much more comfortable behind the camera—leave it to my little cousin to get me to sit for an interview!)

A huge thanks to Craig for making this beautiful video and enhancing my own creative journey on this project!

And of course, stay tuned for the new collection tomorrow morning! (You’ll get an early peek at the designs in our “History of Art” story at the end of the video.)

 

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Thank you for all your wonderful comments and e-mails regarding our new collection—it’s been wonderful seeing Wool People 8 make its way out into the world!

Today we’re sharing a quiet little video that we created from footage taken during our weekend in the Catskills for the Wool People 8 shoot. We rented an old farmhouse just outside of Saugerties Village and spent two days exploring the area with sweaters and cameras. The early September weather was absolutely beautiful—warm in the sunlight and cool in the shade—the kind of weather that reminds you fall is coming, but summer isn’t completely over yet.

Hope you enjoy this “alternate view” of the collection!

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Dear Knitters,

September! It’s always been one of my favorite months. While summer may be psychologically over when the school bells ring, the season just seems all the more golden as the fair weather lingers, mellows, and starts to offer that refreshing autumn crispness in the mornings. While the lazy liberty of vacation may be over, falling back into the year’s routine has its own productive pleasures, too. (There’s still the possibility of weekend camping trips, after all!)

Fisherman-inspired knits for Autumn

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Most importantly, as we well know, Knitting Season is officially open. It’s no longer too hot to contemplate taking up that big cardigan you didn’t finish last winter. Or even if it is, you start to think how good that pile of pieces in your workbasket is going to look at your favorite autumn wool festival (if you can just knit a second sleeve and a collar and sew them all together…). Motivation kicks in.

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BT Fall 14

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I can never resist the call to cast on new projects in September, and that’s why I’m excited to share our BT Fall 14 collection today: a whole fleet of garments and accessories inspired by the rich traditions of nautical knitwear. Our design team set out to reinterpret fishermen’s sweaters in ways we hope will surprise and delight you. From cables to geometric textural patterns to brioche, you’ll see classic elements enlivening completely modern shapes. Whether you like your sweaters generous or fitted, A-line or fashionably oversized, you’re likely to find something in the lookbook that will make your needles sing.

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BT Fall 14

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Construction details and design features for each garment are highlighted directly within the new lookbook and give a great at-a-glance summary of what kind of knitting is in store for any given pattern. We’ve also included a new kind of written feature in this lookbook. Shooting the collection in Red Hook, Brooklyn got me thinking about our roots and mission as a company. Rather than just using Red Hook as an evocative backdrop, we felt compelled to share with you something of its history and its present. Feeling the energy that’s being generated there as community leaders try creative solutions to put their town’s unique resources and people back to work inspired all of us. It affirmed my own resolve to grow Brooklyn Tweed in a way that fuels local industry and helps keep American manufacturing traditions alive. I hope you’ll enjoy thinking about that aspect of our craft as you read our Red Hook essay and share your own reactions and ideas with us!

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BT Fall 14

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I’m also looking forward to showing some of our Red Hook footage in a new BT Vignette video next week, and to turning the spotlight on some of the designs in BT Fall 14, so stay tuned for more to come. If there’s a garment you particularly want to see featured, please let us know!

For the moment, I hope you’ve got a few moments to settle in with the lookbook, enjoy the new collection, and dream up possibilities for your own wardrobe.

.Happy fall!

JF_SIG_printed

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During the end of January, I was invited to photograph Knit, Purl, Sow – an art exhibition of knitted floral and plant sculptures on view at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The show featured knitted works from artists Tatyana Yanishevsky, Ruth Marshall and Santiago Venegas. Unfortunately, I didn’t hear about this wonderful show until the very last week that it was on view, so I was thrilled to have the opportunity to document it in pictures in hopes of sharing it with other knitters who wouldn’t have a chance to view these amazing works of art in person.

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While at the gardens, I was able to sit down with Sonal Bhatt, the Vice President of Education and Interpretation, to learn a bit about the show and how her original idea was realized over a 2-year process of planning.

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One of the goals of the exhibition team at the Steinhardt Conservatory Gallery is to provide visitors with unexpected ways to experience the subject of plant life. Translating a variety of flowers and plants into larger-than-life knitted sculpture was certainly a delightful way to achieve that!

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Upon first seeing the show, I was particularly struck by the artists’ commitment to “botanical correctness”, sometimes going to great lengths to preserve the smallest details and interpret them into knitted fabric. This was an integral part in the direction of the show, and I think it really takes these pieces to another level.

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Each of the three artists featured in the show was asked to interpret the subject of plants through their own unique knitting voice. As knitters, texture plays a huge role in our process of creativity. I loved seeing all the different ways stitch patterns were used to mimic, enhance and interpret the plants that served as the inspiration for the final sculptures.

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Ruth Marshall’s “Lotus” (pictured above) installation was definitely one of the show-stoppers of the exhibition. The work is comprised of several different knitted plants and flowers, mounted together as a wide wall-hanging. I love the knitted veins on the large circular leaves.

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Bhatt shared with me that attendance for this show has been particularly high. She attributes this to the fact that most patrons to the gardens have a broad appreciation for art (and “beauty” in general), but also for needle arts and hand crafts. Viewing the pieces, you are immediately aware of how much detail and handwork has gone into even the smallest pieces. According to Bhatt, the show has attracted larger-than-average crowds for exhibitions at Steinhardt. It’s no surprise that a show like this would do so well in a crafty mecca like Brooklyn.

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Below I’ve included a link to a Wall Street Journal article talking about the show, in case you are interested in further reading.

A big thank you to the BBG for allowing me access to this show with my camera! I hope that I’ve been able to give you, our readers, a sense for this very interesting and unique display of knitwear here in Brooklyn!

–Jared

Resources:

“Knit, Purl, Sow” was on view in the Steinhardt Conservatory Gallery from October 1, 2013 through January 22, 2014.

The Wall Street Journal featured this article about the show in January 2014. 

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My post last Wednesday sent me spiraling back into the archived photos from my Iceland trip – and my mind has been there ever since. I shared a few landscape and travel images last summer, but there were several more that never made it out for viewing. Today seems like a good day for some digital transportation to the north country, doesn’t it?

A red country road

Pastel ocean landscapes

An icelandic sheep with big personality

A cemetery full of trees

Blue coasts

Distant lighthouses under painterly clouds

Fiery lichens

A surreal herd of Icelandic Horses running through the hills

Surreal indeed

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One of my favorite parts about developing yarns is seeing how they inspire other designers – what textures and color combinations other people are inspired by always gets me thinking about the yarns that I use every day in new and different ways. Last year, Stephen West approached me to say he was interested in doing a full design collection using Shelter and Loft – I was flattered, and very excited by the idea of seeing what he would cook up. As we further discussed the project,  we decided we’d also collaborate on a special photoshoot of the finished work the following summer.

Last July, after Stephen had finished designing and knitting his pieces, we met in Iceland for the shoot. It was my first time visiting this beautiful country, and I was completely intoxicated by the dramatic, natural beauty that the country is literally bursting at the seams with. Surrounded by such a visual feast of nature, I barely made it through the exit doors of the airport before my camera was out and firing away.

Stephen has been releasing his designs from this collection over the past few weeks on Ravelry, and I wanted to take a moment to share some of the images from the shoot that I particularly like. Summer light in Iceland (as was the case in Shetland, the year before) is almost too good to be true. Soft, ambient, sometimes dramatic, other times ethereal. Suitable shooting conditions also last about 20 hours a day! It was such a joy to explore and work in this place.

It was amazing to see how the colors of the yarns melded so well with the surrounding colors in the landscape – like the blue-green waves of the ocean on a black sand beach (pictured above). In my mind, mother nature is the very best inspiration for color!

We had fun styling and shooting several of the samples on both the male and female model.

The Hófsos Pullover (also showed at the top of the post on our male model, Diddi) combines large stripes and marl effects in some of my favorite colors of Loft.

Stephen has a great color sense – I loved some of his playful, unexpected combinations, like Nest, Sap, Button Jar and Woodsmoke (in the Kex Scarf, seen below in Shelter).

Looking over these images again has been really enjoyable and reminds me of what a great experience we had there. I often daydream about a return to the Icelandic countryside for future photography work. I’d love to go at a totally different time of year to do some night photography during the “dark season” as well…

All the patterns pictured above are available for purchase here on Ravelry. Each pattern’s page includes extended yardage and color information. Stephen also did a great write-up about our shoot, with several behind-the-scenes pictures that give readers a glimpse of what a shoot looks like on the other side of the camera!

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Resuming this morning with more imagery from October in Harrsiville and the surrounding landscape.

You’ll notice a reflection theme running through these images. The nearby lakes and ponds were all so glassy and still – they look like mirrors in the early morning light. Beautiful.

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Just before the big crazy storm weather started, I spent the week in Harrisville at the spinning mill. The village is stunningly beautiful in all seasons, but nestling into the heart of New England in late October is particularly special. When in need of color inspiration, there aren’t too many things that can beat the myriad shades of fiery foliage that abound in this part of the country.

When in Harrisville, my shutter finger really starts twitching – so I thought I’d share some photographs from my trip with you this morning.

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