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Introducing three new Quarry colors, just in time for winter knitting. Garnet and Lapis add brightness to the existing mineral-based hues, and Granite rounds out our grey and black palette, complementing Moonstone, Slate, and Obsidian.

To see these new colors knit up, we’ve re-knit Burnaby, Lancet, and Halus (shown above from right to left). Each hat can be knit with just one skein of Quarry — pick your new favorite color and knit away!

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Bon tricot! Glückliches stricken! ハッピーニット! Счастливого вязания!

Over the years, Brooklyn Tweed has occasionally released translations of individual patterns in languages other than English. For the first time ever, we’re pleased to announce that as of today, the entire 12-piece Fall 17 collection is now available in French, German, Japanese and Russian. We cherish knitting traditions from around the world as well as support diversity within our collective knitting culture. For these reasons, we chose to work with native-speaking translators who are knitters themselves to bring a full Brooklyn Tweed pattern collection to more knitters of the world. May these additional pattern translations help bridge the barrier when it comes to sharing handwork options globally.

When you purchase a Brooklyn Tweed pattern through our webstore or on Ravelry.com, the pattern PDF will automatically be available in all of its translations. The file name of each PDF designates its language. If you have already purchased a pattern from the Fall 17 collection, the translated versions are available to download in your BT account and/or Ravelry library. (If you’re purchased patterns from our webstore, read how to transfer them to your Ravelry library here.)

Additionally, our Pattern Translations page serves as a resource where you can find a list of all the translations available for Brooklyn Tweed patterns. This list is frequently updated as we’re committed to continuing to offer this service and sharing Brooklyn Tweed patterns with the world’s knitters.

Are there particular patterns from the BT Archives that you wish to see translated into a particular language? If so, leave us a comment below with the pattern name and language and we will add it to our wishlist!

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We’re ready as ever to start knitting for our fall and winter wardrobes, and are eager to have you cast on with us for Brooklyn Tweed’s Fall 17 Knitalong! From now through November 10th we’ll be knitting away at our favorite patterns from the Fall 17 collection.

In the Brooklyn Tweed Ravelry group there has been talk of knitting Hucks, Galloways, and Ginsbergs. Those of us here at BT Headquarters also have plans to knit a few Wallace wraps and Hunter vests. How about you?

Visit our Ravelry group KAL thread to share photos of your project as well as cheer your fellow knitters along. Feel free to use hashtags #BrooklynTweedKAL and #BTFall17KAL on Ravelry, Facebook, and Instagram to join in on the fun and so that we can see what you are making.

We can’t wait to knit along with you!

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The Scandinavian-inspired Galloway cardigan is the perfect blank canvas for knitters wanting to explore “painting with yarn.” Stranded garments that use four colors, like this one, offer a staggering range of possibilities for how your finished sweater looks; the colorway shown in our photos is just one of hundreds of ways you could interpret the design.

When Jared was creating this garment, he tested many color combinations and came up with a total of eight color combinations to get your gears turning. We’re also providing some resources about hue and value to help you make informed color decisions for your own project.

Understanding Color

Generally speaking, the goal of selecting a color palette for colorwork knitting is to ensure the pattern will be easily discernible in the finished fabric, and not muddied or lost among neighboring colors.

Both the hue and value of a color are essential considerations in determining how successful your chosen colorway will be. Simply put, value refers to a color’s relative degree of lightness or darkness (picture a greyscale) and hue is the noticeable attribute of a color (redness, greenness, etc.)

If these terms or concepts are new to you, check out an in-depth explanation about hue and value in Jared’s post about color theory.

Color Values in the Shelter Palette

Above we’ve shown the Shelter palette broken down into three value categories: dark, medium, and light.

In the Galloway pattern, four colors are used to knit the cardigan. Selecting the background color first (C1 in Galloway) will allow you to make better decisions about the rest of your palette, so we recommend you start there.

Selecting colors from all three categories (light, medium, and dark) is always the best approach to stranded colorwork, especially with smaller motifs. When yarns from all three categories are represented, the pattern will have visual “pop.” Alternatively, if multiple colors of very similar values are used, pattern motifs will be difficult to discern.

To give you a sense of the different values used in our samples, we’ve written them down for you here. Use the value categories, corresponding colorways, and the samples listed below as a guide to mix and match your own combinations.

As you can see, some of the mid-values may be used as darks because their hue is so strong/bright that they will hold their own against dark neutrals. With color, everything depends on relative combinations — meaning rules can often be broken — but using the dark/medium/light value approach is a great starting point for color planning, especially if these concepts are new for you.

Compare Colors on Our Website

 

Our yarn product pages feature a useful “Compare Colors” feature aimed to help knitters in color selection. On the Shelter yarn page, select the Compare Colors button just above the color selection box. Once open you can select the colors in the palette and reorganize or remove them to view colors side-by-side.

Additional Color Palette Inspiration

The Grettir pullover also requires four colors of Shelter to knit. For additional color palette inspiration on a similar-style project to Galloway, check out the Grettir projects knit with Shelter on Ravelry.

Speed Swatching for Circular Knitting

Once you’ve made a decision about a final colorway using the above information, it’s time to swatch and test your choices! In knitting, there is simply no substitution for knitting a swatch to see how the finished fabric will appear, and this has never been more true with colorwork. Even experienced colorwork knitters sometimes are surprised by their results with a given color combination after swatching, and it’s always better to be surprised — whether positively or otherwise — on a swatch than on your finished garment!

The Galloway pattern includes instructions on how to speed swatch in the round for colorwork patterns. After swatching, you may find that you need to swap the position of two or more of your colors to achieve a more visually interesting fabric, or even replace one or more of your initial choices to finesse a fabric that needs a touch more contrast.

(And even if you’re using one of our pre-selected color palettes, speed swatching is still important in order to ensure you’re getting gauge!)

We’re Here to Help

Although the Galloway pattern is considered advanced, the required techniques are described at length in the pattern and we’re always here to help. You can reach us on Ravelry in the Brooklyn Tweed Fan Club group or email our pattern support specialist directly at support@brooklyntweed.com. Perhaps you’ll challenge yourself to knit this eye-catching colorwork cardigan during the BT Fall 17 KAL. If so, we’ll be right there with you every step of the way.

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Every year we find ourselves eagerly awaiting the end of summer and the transition to fall. We’re especially excited to share with you this year’s BT Fall collection because it reminds us of all the things we love about the season. We’re looking forward to settling down to work in earnest on our cold-weather wardrobes and for any excuse to wear our knitwear in the meantime.

Join us on Ravelry for our BT Fall 17 KAL to kickstart this transitional knitting season. Choose your favorite pattern (or two!) from the BT Fall 17 collection and join in the fun — the official cast-on day is September 29 so there’s plenty of time to mull over your ideas. We invite you to share what you’re planning to knit in the BT Fan Club forum as the kick-off approaches.

In celebration of the KAL, the Wallace wrap pattern is available to purchase as a limited-edition kit with Quarry yarn. This quick-to-knit and easy-to-memorize pattern will keep you busy throughout the KAL, and you’ll be sure to cross the KAL finish line with a wrap large enough for keeping warm through the rest of the season’s knitting. The Wallace kit ships for free domestically through September 22, just in time to reach you for cast-on day.

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September in the Pacific Northwest is for picking apples, walking the riverbanks under yellow alders, and gathering with friends to watch flocks of migrating swifts bed down for the night in the old school chimneys. Inspired by Oregon country living, our Fall 17 collection offers respite from the city grind. Whether you prefer to curl up in a handsome library with a view of the forest fringe or walk the pastures amongst horses and llamas, the lookbook we’ll release on Wednesday the 13th promises solace and spark for your autumn knitting plans.

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“There is more to life than simply increasing its speed.”
– Mahatma Gandhi

Knitting, like painting or sculpture, is a source of self-expression. What’s more, the fruits of knitting provide us beautiful and practical means to warm ourselves and those we love. It’s completely portable, ready to travel with us to our favorite solitary places in nature, and is just at home in social situations, being shared with those who understand the joy of it.

Knitting also supplies an antidote to the vexing velocity of our time. A few rows of friendly garter stitch can erase a day’s decision fatigue, calming our system and gently transitioning us into quiet time at home. The scent of wool, the bounce of each stitch as its woolen crimp responds to our touch, the sense of mastery as we make sense of new techniques and store them forever in our mental toolbox, are visceral satisfactions. Perhaps we are responding to something deep in our human wiring, a common memory for a different rhythm of life.

If thinking about all this makes your heart flutter a little, we’re right there with you. Our Outpost letter — traditionally an introduction to each of our collection lookbooks — is expanding into a monthly newsletter that allows us to share more stories and thoughts on knitting. Our journey in developing yarns from scratch has introduced us to unexpected and thought-provoking people, places and ideas — we want to share more of them with you.

We’ve also reimagined Outpost to serve as a resource for techniques we’ve learned along the way — details that elevate hand knit garments to timeless items you can fold into a classic, well-considered wardrobe. For this inaugural Outpost, we offer helpful advice on selecting a sweater size and calculating ease.

We support slow fashion and want to explore this inspiring movement with you in coming issues. We look forward to having an ongoing conversation about ideas of quality over quantity, of reclaiming calm from the sometimes frantic pace of daily life.

Select Outposts will include a new pattern that is designed for meditative, beginner-friendly knitting. The joy of knitting need not be complicated, and these patterns will allow for a reprieve from busy days and bigger projects throughout the month. (October’s Outpost will feature a new pattern from Emily Greene.)

We are excited to be kicking off our Outpost series — with every successive newsletter arriving the first Wednesday of each month (click here to sign-up if you’re not yet a subscriber) — and hope you’ll warm your favorite mug and sit with us a bit. We’re glad you’re here.

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Triangular shawls offer a welcome outerwear substitute on chilly days when it’s cold but heavier garments aren’t quite necessary. These adaptable layers are easily incorporated into a wardrobe and can be worn time and time again. Patterned triangular shawls also offer a little more warmth and heft than their lacier cousins. We start grabbing for them right around this time of year as the transition from summer to autumn begins.

This season we’re revisiting Kindling, published in Wool People 4 and a favorite from our textured triangle archive. Originally designed for Loft held doubled (shown right), the pattern’s architectural lines and textures make a great canvas for DK-weight Arbor, too. Knit in our glacial “Rainier” colorway, the arrow motifs and unique four-stitch borders have a clean, sculptural quality with each line etched into the fabric.

Today we’ve released an update for the original Kindling pattern to include yardage and gauge requirements for the Arbor version as well. (If you already own a copy of the pattern, be sure to check for the update in your pattern library!)

We’ve also rounded up a few more of our favorite texture-rich triangular shawls — also worked in Arbor — for additional early-autumn project inspiration.

Shown L to R: Terra, Brora, Burnaby Shawl

As satisfying to knit as they are to wear, we look forward each year to casting on a new shawl as a companion project through the brisk seasons ahead.

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Thank you all so much for joining us for our first official KAL! We hope you learned a lot this summer about the joy and satisfaction of lace knitting, while also adding a few tricks to your technical toolkit.

We’ve included a few highlights from your project shares below, though there’s so much more beautiful work to see on the #BTLaceKAL17 and #BrooklynTweedKAL tags, we hope you’ll go have a look. While our KAL is officially ending, if you haven’t finished your project yet, don’t fret! We’ll keep following along as more projects continue to flow from your needles throughout the rest of summer and into fall. Thanks again to everyone who participated and made this such a fun summer of knitting!

From left to right, top to bottom: Bohochicfiberco, Websterstreetknittery, Mllemichl, Natalieservant, Minib, The_other_emily

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Sometimes questions don’t arise until a project is well underway. Today we’ve selected a few different queries that have come up for folks during the course of their lace knitting journey. Our hope is that today’s final Q&A post answers will be helpful no matter where you’re at in your own lace project.

Q: I’m not ready to knit from a chart quite yet, but I want to knit a garment that only has charted instructions. Is there a way to write out the charted instructions?

A: Once you learn how to read a chart, you can translate the chart into written instructions. The example chart below is written for a piece that is knit flat (there is a right side and a wrong side of the fabric). We’ve described how to read a chart here, but the important things to remember are that charts are read from the bottom row, up and from Right to Left on the odd numbered rows (RS of fabric) and Left to Right on the even numbered rows (WS of fabric). If you are working on a chart in the round, all rows are read from Right to Left.

Each box in a chart accounts for 1 stitch. If there is a stretch of the same kind of stitch/symbol (i.e. 3 knit stitches in a row) you’d want to write them as one step. For example: Knit 3 (K3) versus writing out each individual stitch (Knit 1, Knit 1, Knit 1). This will make your knitting much faster as you won’t have to read instructions for each individual stitch. When knitting lace, you will complete increases and decreases in the same row to create the decorative pattern but maintain the same stitch count. (One benefit of reading charts is that you can see how stitches align vertically row over row, which makes it easier to catch a misplaced decrease or yarn over.)

To translate the chart below, review the Legend to familiarize yourself with the symbols and start with Row 1.

 

These written instructions correspond to the chart above:

Row 1: YO, K3, SSK, K4, P1.
Row 2: K1, P9
Row 3: K2, YO, K3, SSK, K2, P1
Row 4: K1, P9
Row 5: K4, YO, K3, SSK, P1
Row 6: K1, P9

 

Q: In addition to picking up stitches at a regular interval between ridges, are there any tricks for making sure you pickup stitches evenly along a long row of knit edging, such as with Bridgewater?

A: A technique that makes it easier to ensure your stitches have been picked up evenly and that you have the correct amount of stitches when you’re done is to measure the length of the piece and place stitch markers at even intervals along the fabrics edge. The interval will depend on how many stitches you have to pickup. Generally, it’s a good idea to place a marker every 1-2 inches. Divide the total number of stitches you need to pickup by the number of sections you’ve created. When you start to pickup the stitches, do so at a rate that will allow you to pickup that number by the time you reach the next stitch marker.

Q: Is there a difference between nupps and bobbles?

A: There is! Nupps are an Estonian technique that forms a small bump in the knitted fabric which is made by knitting into the same stitch repeatedly with yarnovers between each knit. Five- or seven-stitch nupps are usual; you could go higher, but bear in mind that on the subsequent row the nupp is closed by purling all of those stitches together. (The trick is to make those knits and yarnovers very loose, really pulling the right needle tip back from the fabric.) There’s more than one way to make a bobble, and they can be stockinette or garter based, but most methods have you knit into the front and back of the same stitch several times to create four or five stitches out of one. Then you turn and work multiple rows back and forth on only the bobble stitches to create a little pouch of fabric before binding off the extra stitches to return to your original stitch count and carry on knitting the row.

Nupps sometimes need to be coaxed to the right side of the fabric and give a subtler effect than bobbles – especially as they’re traditionally worked as a decorative element for cobweb-weight lace shawls.

 

Q: Is there a way to even out my decreases?

A: Typically tension will have the biggest effect on how the decrease lays on the finished fabric. After completing the decrease, insert your needle into the next stitch and gently pull the working yarn to tighten the decrease.  If you are experiencing this issue with a left leaning decrease, following our instructions for a modified SSK might help. To do so, Slip 1 stitch knitwise from L to R needle, replace stitch on L needle in new orientation then knit 2 stitches together through the back loops. Practicing the decreases on a swatch may also help you find the correct amount of tension before working on your garment. Also, keep in mind that knitting by hand can produce some imperfections and that’s quite alright — in fact, it’s part of the process and joy of making things by hand.

 

Q: How do you continue to pick up edge stitches if your blocking wire isn’t long enough?

A: Simply start picking up stitches with a new wire and you’ll be good to go! We recommend leaving at least a few inches of space on either end of your blocking wire in case you need to stretch out the fabric further while laying it out on the blocking mat. When pinning your wires to the blocking surface, be sure to place 1 or 2 pins at the point where two wires cross to keep them firmly in place.

 

Q: What type of surface should I block on? Where can I get the blocking board that BT uses?

A: Sadly the blocking boards that we use seem to no longer be in production, but there are many good alternatives available. The most frequently used product are called blocking mats. They are pieces of foam cut in a jigsaw formation that can be connected to accommodate the shape of your project. If the piece is very large, you can use your mattress or a clean carpeted floor. We’ve also heard of people using ironing boards for smaller projects.

If you knit a lot of hap, or pi shawls and like to build your own tools, you might consider making a stretching frame. These frames were traditionally used for blocking Shetland hap shawls. Kate Davies provides excellent instructions on how to make one at home on her blog.

 

Q: How do I weave in my ends invisibly in lace?

A: It’s best to leave long tails and weave in your ends after you have blocked your final piece. The best practice for lace is to weave in an end following the pattern as closely as you can on the wrong side of the fabric. Be sure to check your work on the right side frequently to make sure the yarn isn’t showing through the fabric. After the ends have been weaved in, gently stretch the fabric to ensure the woven in strand has the same tension as the knitted piece, and then cut the tail as close to the work as possible.

 

Q: I completed my first lace shawl and am feeling really confident, what’s a good second lace project?

A: After you have mastered the basics of lace knitting, you’ll have plenty of pattern choices available to you. Patterns that utilize multiple charts, or a larger repeat of a single chart, are a good option for a second lace pattern. We recommend Girasole, Quill and Ravine for your next project. You can also find our catalog of lace projects with an Intermediate skill level here.

Though our Summer of Lace KAL will soon be coming to an end, we continue to welcome questions about lace knitting at any time, feel free to also share with us what you’ve learned here in the comments. And don’t forget to share your projects with us on Ravelry and Instagram with #BrooklynTweedKAL and #BTLaceKAL17!

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